George Pitt House (LT) Historical Report, Block 18-2 Building 48Originally entitled- "Pitt-Dixon House"

Mary A. Stephenson

1960

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library Research Report Series - 1391
Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Library

Williamsburg, Virginia

1990

PITT-DIXON HOUSE

Report Prepared by
Mary A. Stephenson

September, 1960

PITT-DIXON HOUSE
Block 18 Colonial Lot 47

LOCATION:

Colonial Lot 47 in Williamsburg is located on the north side of Duke of Gloucester Street about midway between the Capitol and the College. On Tyler's adaptation of the College Map it is designated "47" with 'Hunter" thereon.

HISTORY IN SUMMARY:

The first mention in the court records of York County in which Lot 47 is noted, was in 1715 when William Timson became the owner via the Trustees of Williamsburg. Timson conveyed to James Shield, tailor, in 1717. The lot, evidently, reverted to the Trustees for Samuel Hyde of York County was owner via the Trustees in September, 1717. By March, 1718/19 Hyde had erected buildings thereon when he conveyed to Joseph Freeman, Hyde located the property as "Lot 47 … adjoining On the Great Street between the Storehouse of Mr Archibald Blair & the house of Henry Gill and all houses outhouses…" He excepted "one piece of the Sd Lott of Ground on the North end thereof the breadth of the Sd Lott & thirty foot in length…" Freeman conveyed to Thomas Jones in 1719. In 1721 Jones owned the property in fee simple valued at £135 current money. In 1722 Christopher De Graffenried, dancing master, became the owner. In 1728 he sold to John White, glazier. White held it only one year when he conveyed to Richard Packe, watchmaker of Williamsburg who kept it until his death in 1731. Sarah Packe, widow, was owner following her husband's death. She kept a milliner's shop at the location. Prior to 1755 Mrs. Packe married William Green. Dr. George Pitt, as guardian of the Garland children and husband of the widow Garland who seems to have been a daughter or close relation to Mrs. Sarah Packe Green, evidently, inherited the property at the death of Mrs. Green in 1757. George Pitt held the property until 1774 when he conveyed to John Dixon, bookseller and printer. In 1775 Dixon conveyed to William Hunter, printer. Joseph Davenport representing Hunter who had fled to England as a Loyalist, held the property in trust until Hunter's son, William, became of age. The property was taxed in the name of William Hunter or his estate until 1805 when Robert Greenhow, merchant, became owner. In 1815 Anthony Dufort held "via Robert Greenhow, house and lot in Williamsburg bounded on the east by another lot of the said Greenhow and by Cary Drummond's lot west." In 1820 Joseph Dufort was owner "via Anthony Dufort's estate." In 1825 James Davis, Jr. possessed the property "fomerly Dufort's". He or his estate owned the houses and lot until 1851 or 1852. Philip Barziza, apparently, became the part owner until his death (date unknown). His daughter, Phillipa Barziza in 1880 conveyed the property to James W. Wilkinson stating that it was "on the corner of Main or Duke of Gloucester Street including the premises once occupied by the Barziza family and by Mrs. Davis…" In 1890 Wilkinson sold a strip on the eastern part of the lot to Edward Debress. Both Wilkinson's and Debress's portions of the lot were conveyed in 1930 and 1928 respectively to Williamsburg Holding Corporation and W. A. R. Goodwin representing the restoration of Williamsburg.

Further details of the various owners, their occupations and changes made to the property can be found in the body of the report to follow.

DATE OWNED BY OCCUPIED BY PROFESSION
1715-1717 William Timson
1717 James Shield tailor
1717 Trustees Williamsburg
1717-1719 Saml. Hyde
1719 Joseph Freeman
1719-1721 Thomas Jones Thomas Jones
1722-1728 Ch: DeGraffenried DeGraffenried? dancing master
1728-1729 John White glazier
1729-1731 Richard Packe Richard Packe watchmaker
1731-1755? Mrs. Sarah Packe Mrs. Packe milliner
1755?-1757 Mrs. Sarah Packe Green Mr. & Mrs. Green milliner
1757-1774 Dr. George Pitt & wife Pitt family apothecary & milliner
1744-1775 John Dixon bookseller
1775-1805 William Hunter or estate printer
1805-1815 Robert Greenhow merchant
1815-1820 Anthony Dufort doctor
1820-1825 Joseph Dufort
1825-1851 James Davis, Jr. merchant
1851-1861 Mrs. Charlotte Davis Mrs. Davis
[date unknown]Philip Barziza (part) Barziza family
18 -1880 Phillippa Barziza
1880-1930 James W. Wilkinson (part) or heirs
1890-1928 Edward Debress or heirs teamster
1930-1960 Williamsburg Restoration, Inc.
HISTORY:pp. 1-55.
APPENDIX:Illustration #1 -------- Maps and Plats
Illustration #2 -------- Williamsburg Land Tax List
Illustration #3 -------- Biographical Sketches
Illustration #4 -------- Inventory &c,
Illustration #5 -------- P.R.O. records-Loyalist claims &c.
Illustration #6 -------- Humphrey Harwood items re the property

PITT-DIXON HOUSE
Block 18 Colonial Lot 47

LOCATION:

Colonial Lot 47 on which the house now known as the Pitt-Dixon House is located, lies on the north side of Duke of Gloucester Street about midway between the Capitol and the College of William & Mary. See: Tyler's adaptation of the College Map, opposite page.

HISTORY:

The first mention of Lot 47 in Williamsburg which has come to light is a conveyance in 1715 by the Feoffees or Trustees of the city to William Timson1 in which two other lots are involved (Lots 46 and 323).

Captain William Timson of York County was born in 1678; married Anna Maria Jones a daughter of the Reverend Rowland Jones (1644-1688), minister of Bruton Parish from 1674-1688.

The first deed of conveyance of Lot 47 follows:

[March 17, 1715]
[Release deed]

[Trustees of Williamsburg
to
William Timson
Consideration: 45 shillings]

THIS INDENTURE made ye Seventeenth day of March… in ye Year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred & Thirteen [sic 1715?] Between ye ffeoffees or Trustees for ye Land appropriated for ye building & Erecting ye City of Wmsburgh of ye one part & Wm Timson of ye County of York Gentt of ye other part WITTNESSETH that Whereas ye sd Wm Timson by One Lease to him by ye sd ffeoffees or Trustees bearing date ye day before ye date of these Presents is in Actuall & peaceable possession of ye premisses herein After granted,… for & in Consideration of forty five Shillings of good & lawfull Money of England to them in hand paid … do hereby Acknowledge. have granted, bargained, Sold, remised, released & Confirmed & by these -2- Rights for themselves, their heirs & Successors … do grant, bargain, Sell, remise, release & Confirm unto ye sd Wm Timson Three certain Lotts of Ground in ye sd City of Wmsburgh designed in ye Platt of ye sd City by these figures (323, 46 & 47) with all Woods thereon growing or being, together with all profits Commoditys, Emoluments & Advantages … TO HAVE AND TO HOLD … for Ever under ye limitations & Restrictions hereafter mentioned & not Otherwise, that is to Say, That if Ye sd Wm Timson his heirs or Assigns shall not within the Space of Twenty-four Months next Ensueing ye date of these Presents begins to build & finish upon Each Lott of ye sd granted premises One good dwelling house or houses, of Such dimensions & to be placed in Such manner as by one Act of Assembly made in ye Capitol ye Twenty Third day of October 1705 … Then it shall & may be lawfull to & for Ye sd ffeoffees or Trustees & their Successors, …to Enter & ye Same to have again as of their former Estate to have, hold & Enjoy in like manner as they might otherwise have done if these Presents had never been made. In Wittness whereof Jno Clayton Esqr & Will Robertson Gentt two of ye said ffeoffees or Trustees have hereunto sett their hands & Seals ye day & Year Above writ.
John Clayton (Seal)
Will Robertson (Seal)

At a Court for York County 19th March 1715 Jno Clayton Esqr & Wm Robertson Gentt Two of ye ffeoffees or Trustees…for ye City of Wmsburgh in Open Court presented & Acknowledged the within Deed of Release for Three Lotts of ye sd Land with receipt thereon to Wm Timson Gentt on whose mocon it is admitted to Record.
Teste Phil Lightfoot Cl Ctr1
Truly Recorded Teste Phil Lightfoot Cl Ctr

It is obvious from examining Tyler's adaptation of the College Map (1791?) or other plats of Williamsburg that Lots 46 & 47 are not adjoining lots. They are separated by Colonial Street.2

When Timson decided upon selling the lots in 1717, he named the lots as in the deed from the trustees, "46, 47 & 323." Obviously, he had built on Lots 46 and 323 but had not built on Lot 47. (Proof of this statement will follow later in the report.) Timson's conveyance to James Shield, tailor, of Williamsburg follows:

[May, 1717]

[William Timson of the County of York, Gent.
to
James Shield of Williamsburg, tailor,
Consideration: 300 Pounds lawful money of England]

-3-

THIS INDENTURE made ye fifth day of June in ye Third Year of ye reign of Our Sovereign Lord George…One Thousand Seven hundred & Seventeen BETWEEN Wm Timson of ye County of York Gentt of ye One part & James Shield of ye City of Wmsburgh Taylor of ye other part Wittnesseth that Whereas ye sd James Shield by One Lease to him made by ye sd Wm Timson bearing date ye day before these Presents is in Actuall & peaceable possession of ye Premisses after menconed to ye intent that by Virtue of ye sd Lease & of ye Statute for transferring Use into possession ye sd James Shield may be ye better Enabled to Accept this Conveyance or Release of ye Reversion & inheritance thereof to him & his heirs for Ever The said Wm Timson for divers good causes & Considerations him thereunto moving but more Especially for & in consideration of ye Sum of Three hundred pounds lawfull Money of England to him ye sd Wm Timson by ye sd James Shield in hand paid at & before ye Ensealing & delivering of these Presents … hath granted, bargained, Sold, Aliened Remised, Released & Confirmed … unto ye sd James Shield his heirs & Assigns for Ever All these Three Lotts of Ground in ye City of Wmsburgh designed in ye Plott of ye sd City by these figures (46: 47: 323) which Three Lotts were granted unto ye sd Wm Timson by ye ffeoffees or Trustees of ye sd City by Deeds of Lease & Release… Recorded in ye Court of ye County of York to gether with all & Singular ye houses thereon & all manner of profits, Advantages & Appurtenances to ye sd Three Lotts belonging…
W Timson (Seal)

Recd of Mr James Shield, ye Sum of Three hundred Pounds lawfull Money of England…& Others mentioned in ye within deed of Release by me.
Wmsburgh June ye 1, 1717
W Timson1

Timson must have allowed Lot 47 to revert to the trustees of the city, for in September, 1717 there is on record a conveyance from the trustees to Samuel Hyde2 of York County:

[September 3, 1717]

[Trustees of Williamsburg
to
Samuel Hyde of York County
Consideration: 15 shillings]

THIS INDENTURE made the Third day of September…[1717] BETWEEN the Feoffees or Trustees for the Land appropriated for the building & erecting the City of Williamsburgh of the One part & Samuel Hyde of the County of York of the other part WITNESSETH that whereas the Said Samuel Hyde by one Lease to him by the Said Feoffees or Trustees bearing date the day before the date of these presents is in actual -4- & peaceable possession of the premises herein after Granted to the intent that by vertue of the Said Lease & of the Statute for Transferring uses into possession he may be the better enabled to accept a Conveyance & Release of the Reversion & inheritance thereof to him & his heirs for ever, The Said Feoffees or Trustees for divers Good Causes & Considerations them thereunto moving but more especially for & in Consideration of Fifteen Shillings of Good & Lawfull money of England to them in hand paid at & before the ensealing & delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof … they do hereby acknowledge HAVE Granted bargained Sold, Remised Released & confirmed … unto the Said Saml Hyde One certain Lott of Ground in the Said City of Williamsburgh designed in the Plott of the Said [sic] by these figures 47, with all woods thereon growing or being… TO HAVE & to hold the Said Granted premises & every part thereof with the appertenances unto the Said Saml Hyde and to his heirs for ever … YIELDING & PAYING the Quitt rents & legally accustomed to be paid for the Same to the only use & behoof of the said Saml Hyde his heirs & Assigns for ever under the Limitations & Reservations here after mentioned and not otherwise That is to Say that if the Said Saml Hyde or his heirs or Assigns shall not within the Space of Twenty four months next ensuing the date of these presents begin to Build finish upon each Lott of the Said Granted Premises One Good dwelling house or houses of Such Dimentions & to be placed in Such manner as by One Act of Assembly made at the Capitol the Twenty Third day of October 1705 Entituled an Act Continuing the act directing the building the Capitol & City of Williamsburgh &c is directed or as shall be agreed upon prescribed & directed by the Directors appointed for the Settlement & encouragement of the City of Williamsburgh…then it shall and may be Lawfull to & for the Said Feoffees or Trustees … to enter and the Same to have again as of their former Estate…
JOHN CLAYTON (Seal)
WIL. ROBERTSON (Seal)

December the 4th 1717. Received of Samuel Hyde
within named fifteen shillings … John Clayton1
[Recorded "At a Court held for York County 16th December 1717"]

It is seen from the above deed that Lot 47 had no buildings thereon. On the 9th of March 1718/19 Samuel Hyde conveyed a part of Lot 47 to Joseph Freeman: 2

[March 9, 1718/19]

[Samuel Hyde of York County
to
Joseph Freeman of York County
Consideration: £ 10 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the Ninth day of March … (1718/19] BETWEEN -5- Samuel Hyde of the County of York of the one part & Joseph Freeman of the Same County of the other part Witnesseth that the sd Samuel Hyde for & in consideration of the Sum of Ten pounds Current money of Virginia to him in hand paid before the ensealing & delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof he doth hereby acknowledge… Doth Grant bargain Sell alien Enfeoff & Confirm unto the Sd Joseph Freeman his heirs & Assigns one certain Lott or half Acre of Ground lying & being in the City of Williamsburgh…designed in the plott of the Sd City by these figures 47 & Adjoining On the Great Street between the Storehouse of Mr Archibald Blair & the house of Henry Gill & all houses outhouses Gardens pastures woods waters watercourses … & all the Estate Right Title property claim & demand whatsoever of him the Sd Samuel Hyde of in & to the Sd premises & every or any part or parcell thereof & the Reversion & Reversions Remainder & Remainders thereof & of every part & parcell thereof (excepting out of the sd premises one piece of the Sd Lott of Ground on the North end thereof of the breadth of the Sd Lott & thirty foot in Length TO HAVE & TO HOID the Sd Lott or half Acre of Ground & all & Singular other the premises herein mentioned & intended to be hereby Granted … (Except as before Excepted) unto the sd Joseph Freeman his heirs & Assigns for ever…
Samuel Hyde (Seal)

Tho: Jones
Jno Harris
Hen Bowcock

Memo That on the Ninth day of March in the year of our Lord 1718 [19] peaceable & quiet possession was delivered & given by the within named Samuel Hyde by the door of the Dwelling house of the premises to the within named Joseph Freeman according to the form & effect of the within Deed in the presence of us whose names are hereto Subscribed
Samuel Hyde1

Thos Jones
Jno Harris
Hen Bowcock
[Recorded "At a Court held for York County March the 16th 1718"]

The amount paid by Freeman - £10 - gives some idea of the size and cost of the building erected upon Lot 47 by Hyde between 1717-1719. (Comparison with other lots purchased at this time, £10 seems average priced.) Hyde names the property as "Lot 47" and he places it as "Adjoining On the Great Street between the Storehouse of Mr Archibald Blair2 & the house of Henry Gill3 & -6- all houses outhouses…" He gives, also, an exception: "one piece of the Sd Lott of Ground on the North end thereof the breadth of the Sd Lott & thirty foot in length" which he kept.

Two months later, June 14, 1719, there was a lease deed on the property from Freeman to Thomas Jones:1

[June 14, 1719]

[Joseph Freeman, Joyner, Williamsburg,
to
Thomas Jones of Williamsburg, merchant,
Consideration: 5 shillings]

THIS INDENTURE made the fourteenth day of June … (1719) BETWEEN Joseph Freeman of the City of Williamsburgh in the County of York Joyner of the one part & Thomas Jones of Williamsburgh aforesd Mercht of the other part WITNESSETH that the sd Joseph Freeman for & in consideration of Five Shillings of Current money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the Sd Thomas Jones at & before the ensealing & delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath Granted bargained & Sold … unto the Sd Thomas Jones All that Lott or half Acre of Ground lying & being in Williamsburgh aforesd in the ad County of York described in the plott of the Sd City by the figures 47. adjoining on the Great Street between the Storehouse now in the Tenure of Archibald Blair Gent & the house now in the Tenure of Henry Gill Shoemaker & all houses outhouses buildings Gardens-Waters priviledges Comoditys & appurtenances whatsoever to the Same belonging or in any wise appertaining excepting out of the above Granted Lott one piece thereof of the breadth of the sd Lott & of the length of thirty foot & lying on the North end of the sd Lott … TO HAVE & TO HOLD the Sd Lott or half Acre of Ground & all & Singular other the premises with their appurtenances Except as before is Excepted unto the sd Thomas Jones his Executors Adminrs & Assigns from the day next before the day of the date of these presents for & untill the end of one whole year from thence next ensuing YIELDING & paying Therefore the Rent of one Grain of Indian Corn at the feast of the nativity of our Lord Christ, if the Same Shall be lawfully demanded to the intent & purpose that by vertue of these presents & of the Statute for Transferring uses into possession the Sd Thomas Jones may be in the actual possession of the hereby Granted bargained premises & be thereby enabled to accept a Grant of the Reversion & Inheritance thereof to him & his heirs upon & under Such provisions & conditions as in & by one Indenture Intended to be made between the sd Joseph Freeman of the one part & the Sd Thomas Jones of the other part & to bear date the day next after the day of the date of these presents …
Joseph Freeman (Seal)

At a Court held for York County June 15th 1719 Joseph Freeman -7- presented & acknowledged this his Deed for Lands lying in this County unto Thomas Jones also appeared Dorcas the wife of the sd Joseph & being first privately examined declared that it was by her free consent … the sd Deed & relinquishment are admitted to Record.
Test Phi: Lightfoot Cl Cr1

This was followed up the next day with a deed of trust:

[June 15, 1719]

[Thomas Jones, merchant, Williamsburg,
from
Joseph Freeman, Joiner, Williamsburg
Consideration: £131 Current money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the fifteenth day of June … [1719] BETWEEN Joseph Freeman of the City of Williamsburgh in the County of York Joyner of the one part & Thomas Jones of Williamsburgh mercht of the other part WITNESSETH that the Sd Joseph Freeman for & in Consideration of the Sum of One hundred & Thirty one pounds of Current money of Virginia to him the Sd Joseph Freeman at & before the ensealing & delivery of these presents by the Sd Thomas Jones in hand paid the Receipt whereof he…doth hereby acknowledge… doth Grant alien Release & Confirm unto the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs & Assigns all that Lott or half acre of Ground lying & being in Williamsburgh aforesd in the Sd County of York Described in the Plott of the Sd City by the figures 47 & adjoining on the Great Street between the Store house now in the Tenure of Archibald Blair Gent & the house now in the Tenure of Henry Gill Shoemaker & all houses outhouses buildings Gardens Waters Priviledges Commodities & appurtenances whatsoever to the Same belonging… excepting out of the above Granted Lott one piece thereof of the breadth of the Sd Lott & of the length of Thirty foot & lying on the North end of the Sd Lott & the Reversion & Reversions Remainder & Remainders rents issues & profites of the Sd bargained premises …all which… premises now are in the actual possession of him the Sd Thomas Jones by virtue of One Indenture of bargain & Sale for a year to him thereof made by the Sd Joseph Freeman bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents… TO HAVE & TO HOLD the Sd Lott of Ground & all & Singular the premises with their & every of their appurtenances except as before is excepted unto the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs & Assigns … for ever. PROVIDED always & these presents are upon this Condition…that if the Sd Joseph Freeman his heirs Execrs or Adminrs or any of them shall well & truly pay or cause to be paid to the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs or Assigns at the Capitol in the Sd City if Williamsburgh the full Sum of One hundred thirty Eight pounds & Seventeen Shillings Current money of Virginia in at or upon the fifteenth day of June which Shall be in the year of our Lord One thousand Seven hundred & Twenty without any deduction or abatement out of the Same for or in respect of any matter or thing whatsoever that then & from thence -8- forth this present Indenture & the Estate hereby Granted Shall cease & determine & the Sd Joseph Freeman for himself his heirs Executors & Admints & for every of them doth Convenant promise Grant & agree to & with the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs & Assigns … that he the Sd Joseph Freeman … Shall & will well & truly pay … unto the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs or Assigns the Sd Sum of one hundred thirty eight pounds Seventeen Shillings at the time & place of payment aforesd …And further that if default Shall happen to be made in payment of the Sd Sum of One hundred thirty Eight pounds Seventeen Shillings… that Then it Shall & may be lawfull to & for the Sd Thomas Jones his heirs & Assigns into the Sd Granted Lott & premises to enter & the Same from thenceforth peaceably & quietly to hold & enjoy… And lastly it is concluded & agreed upon by & between the Sd partys to these presents & the Sd Thomas Jones…shall & will permitt & Suffer the Sd Joseph Freeman Uis heirs & assigns peaceably & quietly to hold & enjoy the Sd Lotts & premises hereby Granted & to use Receive take & enjoy the Rents & profits thereof to his & their own use & uses untill breach Shall be made of the above written proviso or Condition without any lawfull Lott Suit Eviction or Disturbance of or by the Sd Thomas Jones…
Joseph Freeman (Seal)
Tho: Jones (Seal)

June the 15th 1719 Received then of the within named Thos Jones the Sum of One hundred & Thirty One pounds Current money of Virginia being the Condition money with mentioned
Joseph Freeman

At a Court held for York County June 15th 1719 Joseph Freeman in Open Court presented & acknowledged this his Deed for land lying in this County with Rect thereon to Thomas Jones Also appeared Dorcas wife of the Sd Joseph & being first privately examined declared that it was by her free Consent the Sd Deed was made to the Sd Jones at whose motion the Sd Deed Rect & relinquishment are
Recorded
Test Phi: Lightfoot Cl Cur1

Notice the "Condition "… that Freeman would be allowed to remain on the premises until June 15, 1720 at which time he must pay £l38.17.0. Should he default, the property would be taken over by Jones.

In 1720 William Byrd relates in his Diary that he had called at Colonel Jones's:

[May 3, 1720 Williamsburg]

Then I went to court… After dinner we went all to visit Mrs. Bray … Then we went to Mrs. Archer's … Then we forced ourselves on -9- Colonel Jones and drank a bottle of wine … 1

[May 3. 1721]

After dinner we went to the bowling green and I won a bit. Then I went with Colonel Carter to Colonel Jones's and we played at cards … about 10 o'clock walked home… 2

The next record between Freeman and Jones appears in a release deed of February 16, 1721:

[February 16 17 1721/22]

[Joseph Freeman, Williamsburg, joiner,
to
Thomas Jones, Williamsburg, merchant
Consideration: £235 Current money of Virginia]

This Indenture made the 7 [17*] day of Febry…1721 Between Joseph Freeman of the City of Wmsburgh in the County of York Joyner of the one part and Thomas Tones of the City of Williamsburgh aforesaid Merchant of the other part witnesseth That the said Joseph Freeman for and in Consideration of the Sum of 135 £ Current money of Virginia to him in hand paid at and before the ensealing and Delivery of these presents by the said Thomas Jones the Receipt of which he the sd Joseph Freeman doth hereby acknowledge … Hath Granted bargained Sold Alienated Released and Confimed…unto the said Thomas Jones his heirs and Assigns for ever All that lott or half acre of ground lying and being in Williamsburgh aforesaid in the said County of York described in the plott of the said City by the Figures (47) and adjoining on the great Street between the Store-house now in the Tenure of Archlbald Blair Gent. and the house now in the Tenure of Michael Archer3 and all houses … excepting out of the said Lott one piece of ground on the North end thereof of the breadth of the said lott and 30 foot in length which said lott or half acre of ground with the exception aforesaid was by Samuel Hyde conveyed to the said Joseph Freeman by deed bearing date the 9 day of March 1718 and also all the estate Right Title Interest…of him the said Joseph Freeman of in and to the said premises and every part … all which said mentioned granted premises now are in the actual possession of him the Said Thomas Jones by virtue of one Indenture of bargain and Sale to him thereto made by the said Joseph Freeman for the term of one year bearing Date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and by force of the Statute for transferring uses into possession to have and to hold the said lott of half acre of ground and houses thereon and all and Singular other the premises with their and -10- every of their appurtenances except as before is excepted unto the said Thomas Jones his heirs and Assigns…
Joseph Freeman (Seal)…

At a Court held for York County 19 Feby 1721 [/22] Joseph Freeman presented and acknowledged this his deed of Release with receipt thereon to Thomas Jones and Dorcas the wife of the said Joseph…relinquished her right of dower in the sd land. Test Phil Lightfoot Cl Cur 1

Jones did not hold the property long. On August 4, 1722 he conveyed the property to Christopher De Graffenried2 of Williamsburg:

[August 4, 1722]

[Thomas Jones of Williamsburg, merchant,
to
Christopher De Graffenried, Williamsburg,
Consideration: £130 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the fourth day of August … [1722] BETWEEN Thomas Jones of the City of Wmsburgh Merchant of the one part and Christopher DeGraffenried of the City of Wmsburgh aforesaid Gentl of the other part WITNESSETH that the said Thomas Jones for and in consideration of the Sum of One hundred and Thirty pounds of Current money of Virginia to him in hand paid at and before the Ensealing and delivery of these presents by the said Christopher DeGraffenried the receipt whereof he the said Thos Jones doth hereby acknowledge … HATH granted bargained sold Aliened Released and Confirmed… unto the said Christopher DeGraffenried his Heirs and Assigns for ever ALL that Lott or half Acre of Ground lying and being in Wmsburgh aforesaid in the County of York described in the Plat of the said City by the Figures (47) and Adjoining on the great Street between the Storehouse now in the Tenure of Archibald Blair Gentm and the House now in the Tenure of Michael Archer and all houses outhouses Buildings Gargens Waters and Appurtenances whatsoever to the same belonging or in any wise Appertaining (Excepting out of the said Lot one piece of ground on the North end thereof of the breadth of the said lot and thirty foot in length) which said lot or half Acre of ground (with the Exception aforesaid) was by Saml Hyde conveyed to Joseph Freeman and by the said Freeman Conveyed to the said Thos Jones--by Deeds of Lease and? lease dated the Sixteenth and Seventeenth days of February … 1721 /22 and also all Estate right Title Interest use property Reversion claim and demand whatsoever of him the said Thomas Jones of in and to the said premises and every part and parcell thereof…TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said Lot or half Acre of Ground and houses thereon and all and singular other the premises with their and every of their Appurtenances (Except as before excepted) unto the said Christopher DeGraffenried his Heirs and Assigns…
THOS JONES

-11-

Received of the within named Christopher DeGraffenreid the Sum of One hundred and Thirty pounds Current money of Virginia being the Consideration money within mentioned August 4th 1722
Thos Jones1

[Recorded York County Court, Aug. 20, 1722]

The above conveyance notes the "Exception" as in former deeds.

Christopher De Graffenried [VI] was the son of the Landgrave, Baron Christopher De Graffenried (1666-1743) who came to America and settled in North Carolina. He named the town, "New Bern" for Bern, Switzerland. The elder De Graffenried returned to Switzerland but left his son to look after some of his lands. On February 22, 1714/15? the son married Barbara Tempest nee Needham, daughter of the distinguished Sir Arthur Needham of Wymondsley, Hertfordshire, England. The marriage was in Charleston, South Carolina. A few years later, Tscharner, a son, was born and baptized by Commissary Blair at Williamsburg.2

De Graffenried owned several lots in Williamsburg. In 1720 he held Lot 175 to the east of the Palace; in 1723 he held Lot 235 and from 1722-1728 he was owner of Lot 47, subject of this report.

In 1721 De Graffenried taught dancing lessons in the homes of Virginia planters including Colonel Nathaniel Harrison and Francis Hardyman.3 (Mrs. De Graffenried advertised later (1737-1739) that she taught dancing and held balls in Williamsburg.)4

As they owned Lot 47 from 1722 to 1728, we believe that they resided at Lot 47, However, De Graffenried bought Lot 175 in 1720; and in 1723 he was owner of Lot 235.5

-12-

On June 12, 1728 Christopher De Graffenried and Barbara, his wife, conveyed Lot 47 to John White, a Glazier of Williamsburg:

[June 12, 1728]

[Christopher De Graffenried & wife
to
John White,1 glazier of Williamsburg,
Consideration: £115 current money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE Made the twelfth day of June…1728 BETWEEN Christopher Degraffenried of the County of York Gent and Barbara his Wife of the one part & John White of the City of Williamsburgh Glazier of the other part WITNESSETH that Whereas the said John White by One Lease to him by the Said Christopher DeGraffenreidt and Barbaray his Wife Made bearing date the day before the day of the date of these presents is in Actual and Peaceable possession of the premises herein after Granted to the Intent that by Virtue of the said Lease and of the Statute for Transferring Uses into possession he the said John White might be the better Enabled to Accept a Conveyance and Release of the Reversion and Inheritance thereof to him & his heirs for Ever the Said Christopher Degraffinreidt and Barbaray his Wife for divers good Causes… but more Especially for and in Consideration of the Sum of One Hundred and fifteen pounds Current Money to them by the Said John White in hand Already paid … HAVE bargained Sold demised Aliened Enfeoffed Released & Confirmed… ALL that Lott of ground Scituate Lying and being on the North Side of the Maine Street in the Said City of Williamsburgh and Denoted in the plan of the Sd City by the figures 47 and Adjoining to the lott now in the Tenure & Occupation of Mrs Joanna Archer Widow AND ALSO the Dwelling house Out-houses Yards Gardens Ways Profits Commodities Emoluments and Advantages Whatsoever on and Unto the Said Lott of Ground… (Excepting out of the Said Lott a Certain Parcell or Dividend on the North end thereof to Measure thirty feet on the length of the Lott and to be of the Whole breadth thereof Which Dividend was heretofore Reserved to Saml Hyde Who fomerly possessed the Same Lott) AND ALL the Estate Right Title and property of him the said Christopher DeGraffinreadt and Barbaray his Wife of in and Unto the said bargained premises … TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said Lott of ground and all other the above bargained premises … (Except as before is Excepted & Reserved)…

Christopher De Graffenrieadt (Seal)
Barbara DeGraffinriedt (Seal)2

[Recorded "At a Court held for York County June 17th 1728"]

The above deed of conveyance is the same as other deeds to this property in that the exception to that portion of the lot on the north is not -13- conveyed.1 The amount asked for the property was £115 which is slightly less than the price paid by De Graffenried in 1722, (£130).

White held Lot 47 only six months. On January 7, 1729 White and wife conveyed the property to Richard Packe: 2

[January 7, 1729]

[John White, Glazier and Margaret, his wife, Williamsburg
to
Richard Packe, watchmaker, Williamsburg
Consideration: £115 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE Made the Seventh day of January … [1728/29] BETWEEN John White of the Citty of Williamsburgh Glazier and Margaret his Wife of the one part & Richard Packe of the Same City Watchmaker of the other part WHEREAS the said John White and Margaret his Wife by one Certain Indenture of Bargain and Sale bearing date the Seventeenth day of June … [1728] Made between the said John White by the Name of John White of the City of Williamsburgh Glazier and Margaret his Wife of the one part & John Holloway of the Same Citty Esqr of the other part for the Consideration of one hundred & fifteen pounds Currt Money did bargain Sell demise and to farm lett Unto the Said John Holloway his Execurs Admrs & Assigns ALL that Lott of Ground Scituate Lying and being on the North Side of the Maine Street in the Said City of Williamsburgh and denoted in the plan of the Said Citty by the figures 47 and Adjoining to the Lott now in the Tenure and Occupation of Mrs Johanna Archer Widow and also the Dwelling house Out houses Yards Gardens Ways Waters profits Commodities Emoluments and Apurtenances Whatsoever on and to the Said lott of ground being or in any Wise Appertaining (Excepting out of the Said Lott a Certain parcel or Dividend on the North End thereof to Measure thirty feet on the Length of the Lott and of the Whole brath thereof Which Dividend was heretofore Reserved to Samuel Hyde who formerly possessed the Said Lott TO BE HELD Unto the Said John Holloway … from the day Next before the date of the Same Indenture Unto the full End and Term of five hundred Years from thence Next Ensuing and fully to be Compleat and Ended AND WHEREAS the Said John Holloway by his Assignment Endorsed on the back of the said Indenture bearing date the fifteenth day of this present Month of January for the Consideration therein Mentioned hath Sold Assigned and Made over Unto the Said Richard Packe his Execurs Adminrs & Assigns ALL the Remainder of the Said Term of Years the Said Indenture Mentioned Yet to come off in and Unto the Said Demised -14- Premises and Every part thereof in Manner and form as in the Same Indenture is Expressed … NOW THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH that the said John White and Margaret his Wife for divers good causes them thereunto Moveing but more Especially for and in Consideration of the Sam of One hundred & Twenty pounds Current Money to them or one of them in hand by the Said Richard Packe Well and Truly paid … HAVE granted bargained Sold Remised … Unto the Said Richard Packe his heirs and Assigns ALL the Above Specified Lott of Ground According to the description thereof Above set down Together with the Dwelling house Out houses gardens and all and Singular other the Demised premises with their and Every of their Appurtenances Excepting out of the Said Lott A certain parcel or Dividend on the North End thereof as the same is Above Limitted Described and Reserved Unto Sam'l Hyde Who formerly possessed the Said Lott TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said lott of Ground with the houses and all & Singular Other the before granted premises…(Excepting as Above is Excepted & Reserved) Unto the Said Richard Packe his heirs and assigns… for Ever…

John White (Seal)
Margaret M White (Seal)1

[Recorded "At A Court held for York County Janry 20th 1728[29] Margaret White relinquished her Right of Dower in Sd land…"]

In December, 1729 a Deed of conveyance from Samuel Hyde and wife to Richard Packe indicates that Hyde - who had held the narrow strip at the back of Lot 47 since 1717 - at last sells it:

[December 15, 1729]

[Samuel Hyde of York County & Sarah, his wife,
to
Richard Packe of Williamsburg
Consideration: £6 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the fifteenth day of December…1729 BETWEEN Saml Hyde of Williamsburgh and Sarah his Wife of the one part and Richard Packe of the other part Whereas by one Indenture bearing date the ninth day of March MDCCXVIII … between the said Saml Hyde of the one part and Joseph Freeman of the same County of the other part The said Saml Hyde for the consideration therein mentioned did grant bargain sell alien enfeoff and confirm unto the said Joseph Freeman his heirs and Assigns one certain Lot or half Acre of ground lying & being in the City of Williamsburgh in the County aforesaid designed in the plat of the said City by the figures (47) and adjoining on the great Street between the Storehouse of Mr Archibald Blair and the house of Henry Gill (excepting out of the said premises one piece of the said lot of ground on the north end thereof the breadth of the said lot and 30 foot in length TO HOLD to the said Joseph Freeman his heirs and assigns for ever AND Whereas the Estates interest of the said Joseph Freeman in -15- and to the premises is by several mean Conveyances come to and is now Rested in the said Richard Packe who hath agreed with the said Samuel Hyde whose of that part of the said Lott in a [torn] excepted NOW THIS INDENTURE W [torn] the said Saml Hyde and Sarah his Wife for and [torn] … they do hereby acknowledge and thereof and of [torn] thereof do hereby acquit and discharge him the [torn] his Executors and Adminrs and for [torn] HAVE granted bargained sold above [torn] unto the said Richard Packe his heirs and assigns the before mentioned piece of ground in and by the above recited Indenture excepted and all houses … to the same belonging…AND all the Estate Right Title Property Claim & demand … TO HAVE & TO HOLD … for ever …IN WITNESS…

Saml Hyde (Seal)
Sarah Hyde (Seal)1

[Recorded at a Court for York County December 15, 1729. Sarah Hyde came into court and relinquished her right of dower]

John Mercer, lawyer, of "Marlborough," author of an "Abridgement of the Laws of Virginia" (1737), came to Williamsburg frequently in connection with his law practice or because of his interest in politics. On one visit, in April, 1730, he had an account with Richard Pack[e] of Williamsburg: "By a watch to be returned if I don't like it --- £ -.4.6" [and] "By a silver spoon 10/ --- £ -.12.6 thimble …" 2

By 1731 Packe had died. In the York County Records there is an order of court binding Mary, daughter of Richard Packe, deceased, to Joseph and Margaret Davenport to learn the art of mantuamaking for 4 years.3 No will or inventory for Packe has been located.

During 1732 Orders of York County indicate that Sarah Packe, widow, filed suits against several people for debts. In 1732 she was executrix for the estate of John Mayhew. And, in 1736 Mrs. Packe filed suit against one McIntosh for debt. 4

-16-

From 1737-1742 in the settlement of the estate of William Keith, there is an account with Sarah Packe (milliner or storekeeper):

Dr The Estate of WILLIAM KEITH deceased in Account with Sarah Packe
1737To Ballance due on Settlement £ -.2.0
November 22dTo 1 pair Girls Shoes -.3.6
1738. May 13To 1 lb Bohea Tea 9.0
June 12To 1 lb Ditto 9.0
1739. Decembr 25.To 1 pair Shoes 5.6
1740. April 10…
July 7To 1 pair 1/2 dozn Milk Pans -.4.0
1741. April 15To 1 pair Stockings 8 1/2 Handkerchief 3/4-.1 Do 2/10-.14.2
May 16To 1 Womans Hatt 18/ Hatband & Ribbon 4/6 --------- 1.2.6
Do 26To 1 lb brown Thread pr your Note ----------------- -.3.4
July 12.To 1 Box Candles 53 lb Nett @ 7 1/2 --------------- 1.13.1 1/2
1742 July 13.To 1 Gallon Rum-.4.6
£ 8.14.1 ½
P[er] Contra Cr
By a pair Stays£ 2.0.0
1741By 2 pair Do for my Daughter 2.0.0
1743By 1 pair Childs Do for Mrs Smith1.2.0
By widening a pair for Do -.6.0
£ 5.8.0
Ballance Due 3.6.1 1/2
Errors Excepted pr SARAH PACKE - £ 8.14.1 1/2
1746 April 16th Sworn to by Its Sarah Packe before me Wm Parks1

-17-

In June, 1737 John Mercer, lawyer, returned to Williamsburg on business and had lodgings at Mrs. Packe's:

THIS is to give Notice, That the Subscriber will attend at Mrs. Packe's in Williamsburg, the Week before next October General Court, to meet all Persons who have Business with him…
John Mercer 1

In March, 1738 Mrs. Sarah Packe was advertising mourning goods for sale:

Bombazeens, Crapes, and other Sorts of Mourning, for Ladies; also Hatbands, and Gloves, for Gentlemen: Sold by Sarah Packe, in Williamsburg. 2

A newspaper notice from John Mercer on July 14th states that he intended "to be at the Lodging; I have taken, at Mrs. Pack's, in Williamsburg the Week before the next General Court… " 3

Thus we note that Mrs. Packe had both a lodging house and a millinery shop .

On May 10, 1745 in The Maryland Gazette under "Williamsburg, April 18" there was an account of the drowning of Graves Packe, son of Mrs. Sarah Packe of Williamsburg. The young man was 18 years old. He was bound up the Bay. 4

While the General Court was in session in April, 1746 Edmund Pendleton, lawyer, stayed at Mrs. Packe's:

[March 27, 1746]

THE Subscriber purposing to give his Attendance, as a Practitioner of the Law, at the next General Court, in April gives this Notice thereof; and that all Persons who have Occasion, may apply to him at his Lodgings at Mrs. Packe's next Door to the Printing-Office , -18- in Williamsburg , during the Time of the Court and a few Days before and after.
Edmund Pendleton . 1

There is court evidence to indicate that several dealings had subsisted for many years between William Parks, owner of the Virginia Gazette, and Sarah Packe - dealings which seem to point to Parks and Packe, perhaps, having a store together or Parks assisting Packe financially. On May 15, 1749 a suit between William Parks and Sarah Packe was dismissed "By Agreement of the Parties … and the Defts Ordered to pay unto the Plt his Costs." 2

In August, 1749 there was an agreement between the two:

[August 19, 1749]

WHEREAS several dealings have subsisted for many Years between William Parks & Sarah Pack of Wmsburgh which have not been so exactly settled between them as they ought by reason of the great Variety of them therefore To prevent all Disputes that may happen after the Death of us the Subscribers or either of us, we do mutually agree as follows: That William Parks's Estate shall pay to Sarah Pack or his Heirs or Executors in case he the said William dies before the said Sarah the Sum of five Hundred Pounds, that is to say, One Hundred Pounds a year for five Years. And also that the said Sarah Pack in case of the Death of the said William shall have use & enjoy the Plantation of the said William near Williamsburgh called Thomas's Plantation for her natural Life and as long as She shall Live thereon together with the stock of cattle &c thereon and three Negroes that use to work there Caser excepted. In consideration whereof that the said Sarah Pack do fully release Discharge and acquit the said William Parks his Heirs Executors & Administrators from all Bargains Contracts Dues Debts and Demands whatsoever from & between them and shall also relinquish her Right & Title to any share of the Debts due on the store Book in Partnership in Williamsburgh between them: Except such of the Debts now due in the said Book which the said Sarah is to have one half of and the said William the other half this to affect only the Store-Goods in Williamsburgh the goods that were sent from Williamsburgh, to my storehouse at Hanover Courthouse in the time of the small Pox in Williamsburgh are between us both and the said Sarah Pack is to receive one Half of the Debts for them & Wm Parks the other half, and Wm Parks is to pay one Half of the Debt due to Elizabeth Ballard, on Bond and Sarah Pack the other Half; This Agreement is made only in case of the Death of either Party that the Heirs, Executors or -19- Administrators of both Parties may be concluded and determined thereby and that no vexatious Troubles of Law's Suits may happen, after either of their Deaths. nevertheless, it is agreed, that if both the said Parties live & meet together again that unless both of them agree this shall continue and be binding to them and their Heirs Executors and Administrators that then it be void & have no Effect. IN WITNESS to this agreement we hereto mutually set our Hands and Seals this Nineteenth Day of August. 1749.
Wm Parks (L.S.)1
Sarah Packe (L.S.)

Sign'd Sealed acknowledged & Delivered
mutually each to the other in the
Presence of
Robert Stevenson Jos Johnson
John Coulthard

[Recorded "At a Court for York County the 16th day of July 1750]

The will of Parks, written March 30, 1750 and proved June 18, 1750 stated that "it is my desire that the accounts now open between Mrs. Sarah Pack and me be settled by Mr. John Garland on her part and Mr. Benjamin Waller on my part and all contracts or agreements between the said Sarah Pack and me to stand void til the determination of John Garland and Benjamin Waller …" 2 Parks died en route to England at sea on April 1, 1750.3 In the "Settlement" of his estate listing debits and credits 1756-1754, there are items under Debits: "April 1, 1751 To Cash paid Sarah Packe as Pr Agreement and Award--£100" and "Delivered to Mrs Packe by Agreement with Mr Parks and Pr Order of Mr Ben: Waller and others Arbitrators" [negroes, horses, shoats, steers, cows, tumbler and wheels, beds &c amounting to £157 more or less]. Also, "To a Judgment obtained by Sarah Packe------£1l8.11.3" 4

Unfortunately, the above references to the Parks-Packe relationship is all that we have found in the records.

-20-

In 1750 and 1751 Mrs. Packe is found in the court sueing William Dering for debt1 and selling Lot 32 in Williamsburg to D. Middleton. In the last she is noted as "Sarah Packe of James City Widow."2

Sometime prior to March, 1755 Mrs. Sarah Packe had married William Green of Williamsburg. Green stated this in a notice in the Virginia Gazette:

Williamsburg , March 27, 1755.

THIS is to give Notice, to all Persons that are indebted to the late Widow Sarah Packe , now Sarah Green , not to settle with George Pitt , or any Person besides her Husband the Subscriber; therefore all those who are indebted to her, are desired to come and pay their respective Balances to me; and all Persons that have any Demands against the Said Sarah , are also desired to bring in their lawful Accounts, that they may be discharged, by me,
William Green3

Perhaps, Dr. Pitt became excited over Green's notice, because, on March 13, 1755 William Green and Sarah his Wife "late Sarah Packe Widow" had conveyed a piece of land in York County to one Robert Drurey of Warwick - the price named being £45. 4

George Pitt replied to Green in the April 11th edition thus:

[April 11, 1755]

Hanover County, April 8, 1755.

WHEREAS Mr. William Green , Merchant, of the City of Williamsburg , hath advertised all Persons indebted to the late Sarah Packe , (now Sarah Green ) not to settle with George Pitt , or any Person besides himself, who has no Right or Power to settle with any Person so indebted before the 19th Day of February 1754. At which Time Mrs. Sarah Packe did make an Agreement with, and sold to the Subscriber her Lot Houses in Williamsburg , with all the Furniture therein, and also her Life in a Plantation near Williamsburg , known by the Name of Morris's Plantation, together with all the Stock on the said Plantation; and seven Negroes, viz. Bridget, London, Lambeth, Robin, Sam, Sarah , and Tom , and also all Debts of what kind or Quality soever, that were due to the said Sarah ; all which for the Consideration of Eleven Hundred Pounds current Money; for which Sum, at the Request of the said Sarah , I gave a Bond, payable -21- after her Death as to be directed by her Will, and to pay Fifty-five Pounds per Annum Interest during her Life.

Since Mr. Green's Marriage with the above Sarah Packe , I have demanded of him to carry this Agreement into Execution, (at the same Time tendering him one Year's Interest above) which he refused to do; and it having been hinted to me, That Mr. Green and Wife may sell every of the Premisses above-mentioned, and go for England .

This is therefore to caution all Persons from making a Purchase of the same, or any Part thereof, from Mr. Green or Mrs. Green or paying any Debts that was due to the above-named Sarah , on the Date aforesaid, to either of them; but are desired to pay such Ballances to me only, as I have the Right to receive the same, and will indemnify any Person for so doing.

I will allow Five per Cent . Discount for such of the above Debts as are paid me, by the 15th Day of June next.
George Pitt. 1

To sum up the situation from the will of Parks (1750) to April, 1755: it looks as though Mrs. Packe was in debt brought on by the death of Parks, that she made an agreement in February, 1754 with George Pitt to buy her house and lot with furniture therein and life right in a plantation known as "Morris's" with stock and 7 negroes, and that she was to Pay £55 per year interest the rest of her life to Pitt. Whereupon, she marries one William Green who would not assume Mrs. Packe's (now Mrs. Green's) obligations to Pitt.

It is the writer's belief that Mrs. Packe had a niece or daughter, Sarah, who married John Garland,2 ca.1748. Garland dying shortly, left a widow Garland and a son, John Packe Garland, and a daughter, Elizabeth Garland. 3

A joint account in the Account Book(1752-1755) of Alexander Craig, -22- Williamsburg saddler, shows that he did work for "Mrs SARAH GARLAND & Mrs Packe." The account is so listed.1 Charges for mending a chaise, topping shoes, harness for pole chair, lace for chair, brass nails &c &c were charged. On the Contra side of the ledger, Dr. Pitt assumed the entire charges against Mrs. Garland & Mrs. Packe in 1754 ------ £8:15:11. 2 We know that Dr. George Pitt married Sarah Garland, widow, in 1753. 3 John Packe Garland's will (1771) names his "mother Sarah Pitt" and "George Pitt, son of George and Sarah Pitt." 4 There was some connection between Mrs. Sarah Packe who married William Green and Mrs. Garland. She may have been her mother. (To follow in the report.)

In June, 1757 a "Sarah Green" was dead. An inventory of her estate in York county indicated that she left an estate of £338 with debts due from G. Pitt and J. Shelton. 5 In the inventory of the personal estate the interior of the house in which the items were, is described thus: "In the Hall," "In the Closet in the Hall," "In the Upper Chamber," "In the Kitchen," and "In the Porch." (See: inventory for Mrs. Green's estate, Illustration #4.)

Pitt had advertised the house and lot "late belonging to Mrs. Pack … wherein Mr. Green Merchant, now lives" to be sold at public auction in April, 1757:

[April 22, 1757]

To be SOLD at public Auction, before Mr. WETHERBURN's Door, on-23- Tuesday the 26th Instant ,
AN House and Lott, in the City of Williamsburg , very well situated, wherein Mr. Green , Merchant, now lives, late belonging to Mrs. Pack ; with a Kitchen, Dairy, Outhouses, and Garden; also a Store, with a Cellar, and several other very good Conveniences. The Purchasers will have Credit for one Half till October next, and the other Half till April following, on giving Bond and Security to
George Pitt . 1

Note that dwelling, kitchen, dairy, outhouses, garden and a store are on the lot.

In July, 1759 in York County Court George Pitt and Thomas Moore2 were sued by William Stevenson for debts amounting to £290 since December, 1756.3 In August, 1759 Pitt was sued by Robert Cary & Company of London, for debt.4 (These may indicate that Pitt was not in such good financial condition as he had once been.)

In November, 1758 Dr. Pitt had given a deed of trust on the property to Benjamin Bailey: 5

[Nov. 20, 1758]

[George Pitt, Williamsburg, apothecary and surgeon, & Sarah, his wife,
to
Benjamin Bailey, Williamsburg, merchant,
Consideration: £5]

This Indenture made the twentieth day of November…[1758] -24- BETWEEN George Pitt of the City of Williamsburg Apothecary and Surgeon and Sarah his wife of the one part and Benjamin Bailey of the same place Merchant of the other part WITNESSETH that for and in Consideration of the sum of five pounds by the said Benjamin Bailey to the said George Pitt in hand paid at or before the sealing and Delivery of these presents … they the said George Pitt and Sarah his wife Have…Granted bargained sold aliened Enfeoffed and Confirmed … unto the said Benjamin Bailey and his Heirs ALL THAT Messuage or dwelling house and Store house thereto adjoining with the Lott or Ground thereto belonging where they the said George and Sarah now Live Situate and being on the North side of Duke of Gloucester Street in the said City of Williamsburg and next adjoining the Printing office with all outhouses Yards Gardens, Stables and ways thereto belonging … TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said dwelling house and Store house and all & singular the premises herein before mentioned or intended to be hereby Granted and Conveyed unto the said Benjamin Bailey his Heirs and Assigns … forever…
G PITT (L.S.)
SARAH PITT (L.S.)

[Recorded York County Court May 21, 1759]

GEORGE the second … To Peyton Randolph John Prentis and William Waters Gent. Greeting WHEREAS George Pitt and Sarah his wife by their certain Indenture of Bargain and Sale bearing date the twentieth day of November last past have Sold and conveyed unto Benjamin Bailey the Fee simple Estate of a certain messuage or dwelling house and Store house with the Lott or Ground thereto belonging in the City of Williamsburgh in the County of York AND WHEREAS the said Sarah cannot conveniently Travel to the Court of our said County to make acknowledgement of the said Conveyance Therefore we do give unto you or any two of you Power to receive the acknowledgement which the said Sarah shall be willing to make…
Thos Everard. 1

The next month Bailey returned the same property to Pitt naming five pounds as the consideration:

[Benjamin Bailey, Williamsburg merchant,
to
George Pitt, Williamsburg, apothecary & surgeon,
Consideration: £5]
[December 23, 1758]

THIS INDENTURE made the twenty first day of December …[1758] BETWEEN Benjamin Bailey of the City of Williamsburg Merchant of the one part and George Pitt of the same Place apothecary & Surgeon of the other part WITNESSETH that for and in Consideration of the sum of five pounds … He the said Benjamin Bailey hath Granted -25- Bargained Sold aliened released enfeoffed and Confirmed … unto the said George Pitt and his Heirs all that Messuage or dwelling house & Store house thereto adjoining with the Lot and Ground thereto belonging where the said George Pitt now Liveth Situate and being on the North side of Duke of Gloucester Street and in the said City of Williamsburg & next & adjoining to the Printing Office with all outhouses Yards Gardens Stables and ways…TO HAVE AND TO HOLD…
Ben: Bailey (L.S.) 1
[Recorded York County Court July 16, 1759]

In the two deeds quoted above, it is stated that on the lot were a dwelling house, a storehouse with gardens and stable.

On October 10, 1759 a mortgage between Doctor Pitt and Sarah, his wife, and William Cowne and John Quarles of King William County, George Webb of New Kent County - merchants - and John Robinson of King and Queen County, administrator of Henry Robinson late of Hanover County, stated that these men had gone on a bond for George Pitt "at his special Instance and Request in the County Court of Hanover as security for the faithfull discharge of the Guardianship of Elizabeth Garland and John Packe Garland Orphans of John Garland late of the said County of Hanover deceased to whom the said George Pitt was by the said Court appointed Guardian"

Also, noted in the indenture was mention that Pitt had recently conveyed to Benjamin Bailey; and very soon afterwards Bailey had deeded the property in fee simple back to Pitt. Then, Pitt gave deed of trust to these gentlemen entering into bond as security "for the True and faithfull discharge of his Guardianship…" Pitt was "to deliver to the Orphans [of Garland] what money or other estate belonging to them … by Virtue of his said Guardianship…" The indenture follows:

[Oct. 10, 1759]

[George Pitt
to
William Cowne and others
Consideration: 5 shillings]

THIS INDENTURE made the tenth day of October… [1759] BETWEEN -26- George Pitt of the City of Williamsburgh Doctor of Physick and Sarah his wife of the one part and William Cowne and John Quarles of the County of King William and George Webb of the County of New Kent Merchants and John Robinson of the County of King and Queen Esqr Administrator &c of Henry Robinson late of the County of Hanover Gent deceased of the other part WHEREAS the said William Cowne George Webb and John Quarles were together with the said Henry Robinson in his lifetime Bound for the said George Pitt at his special Instance and Request in the County Court of Hanover as security for the faithfull discharge of the Guardianship of Elizabeth Garland and John Packe Garland Orphans of John Garland late of the said County of Hanover deceased to whom the said George Pitt was by the said Court appointed Guardian NOW THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH That the said George Pitt and Sarah his wife as well for the securing saving harmless and indemnifying the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles and The Heirs & Administrator of the said Henry Robinson deceased and each of them from all Costs Charges and Damages that they or either of them shall or may Sustain for or by Reason of their Suretiship aforesaid as for and in Consideration of the Sum of five Shillings to the said George Pitt & Sarah his wife by the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles and John Robinson in hand paid at or before the ensealing and delivery of these Presents … Have Granted Bargain'd Sold Aliened and Confirmed…unto the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles and John Robinson their Heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns all that Messuage Tenement whole Lot and parcel of Land Situate Lying and being on the north side of the main Street called Duke of Gloucester Street in the City of Williamsburgh adjoining to the Printing Office known & described in the Plan of the said City by the number 47 which said Messuage Lot & Tenement was lately conveyed by the said George Pitt and Sarah his wife unto Benjamin Bayley of the said City Merchant & by him reconveyed to the said George Pitt in Fee Simple as by the said several conveyances of Record in York County Court may more fully appear together with all houses Outhouses Edifices Buildings Yards, Gardens, Trees, Ways, Waters … & Appurtenances thereto belonging or in any wise appertaining and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and Remainders Rents Issues & Profits thereof, and all the Estate Right, Title, Interest, use, Trust, possession… of them the said George Pitt & Sarah his wife of in and to the same and all Deeds Evidences and writings touching or in any wise Concerning the said premises To have and to hold the said Messuage Tenement and Lott of Land and all and singular the premises herein before mentioned or intended to be hereby Granted unto the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles and John Robinson their Heirs & Assigns … Provided always and these presents are upon this Condition that if the said George Pitt his Heirs Executors or Administrators do well and truly save harmless and keep indemnified the said William Cowne George Webb and John Quarles and the Heirs and Representatives of the said Henry Robinson deed and every of their Heirs Executors and Administrators Goods Chattels Lands & Tenements from all Actions Suits Judgments Decrees Executions Costs -27- and Damages that shall or may be had commenced Obtained Sued out Levied or Accrue against them the Said William Cowne George Webb and John Quarles … or against the Heirs…of the said Henry Robinson Deed … on account of their being Security and entering into Bond with the said George Pitt for the True and faithfull discharge of his Guardianship aforesaid Then this present Indenture and The Grant hereby made and every Clause Article and Thing herein Contained shall Cease determine and become absolutely Void and of no Effect And the said George Pitt for himself his Heirs Executors & Admors doth Convenent promise and Grant to and with the said William Cowne…[&c] by these presents in Manner and form following that is to Say that he the said George Pitt his Heirs Executors or Administrators shall and will well and truly pay & Deliver to the Orphans aforesaid or to their Legal Representatives when lawfully demanded all Sums of Money and other Estate belonging to them or either of them wherewith the said George is or may by Virtue of his said Guardianship be Chargeable and will also well and truly save harmless and keep indemnified them the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles … and the Heirs … of the said Henry Robinson… on account of the said Suretiship in manner and form as in the said proviso before recited is expressed & Contained And further that he the said George Pitt at the time of the Sealing and Delivery of these presents hath a Good Estate of Inheritance in fee Simple of and in all and singular the premises before mentioned to be Granted and now hath in himself good right and Lawfull and absolute power and authority to Grant the same in manner and form aforesaid And that the said Lott Houses and premises are free and Clear from all incumbrances whatsoever And FURTHER also that in Case he the said George Pitt…shall make any DEFAULT in Saving keeping harmless & indemnifying the said William Cowne George Webb John Quarles and the Heirs Admrs & Representatives of the said Henry Robinson at any time or times hereafter for and on Account of their Sureteship aforesaid that then and from thenceforth they… shall or Lawfully may from time to time and at all times hereafter freely quietly and Peaceably have hold occupy possess and enjoy the said Messuage Tenement Lott Houses and premises and to receive and take all the Rents Issues and Profits thereof to their and each of their own proper use and Behoof without any manner of lett Suit Trouble hindrance denial interruption or disturbance of or by the said George Pitt and Sarah his wife…
George Pitt (L.S.) 1
Sarah Pitt (L.S.)

[Recorded York County Court November 19, 1759]

We know nothing further about Dr. Pitt until February 12, 1762 when he advertised in the Virginia Gazette that he had just imported a fresh assortment of drugs and medicines, and that he was located at the Sign of -28- the Rhinoceros, next Door to the Printing Office, Williamsburg:

[February 12, 1762]

JUST IMPORTED, A fresh Assortment of Drugs and Medicines, By the Subscriber, at the Sign of the RHINOCEROS, next Door to the Printing Office , Williamsburg,
ALSO CINNAMON, NUTMEGS, RAISINS of the Sun, Prunes, coloured, Carraway and Coranider Comfits, Almond Comfits, Barley Sugar, Candied Eringo, Preserved Ginger and Nutmegs, Grits, Oatmeal, Sago, Sallad Oil, Capers, French and Spanish Olives, Black Lead Pots, best Lancets, Bateman's Drops, Squire's and Stoughton's Elizirs, Turlington's Balsam, British Rock Oil, Hungary Water, Shell Almonds, Sticking Court Plaister, Tow, Vials, Gallipots, &c.

Whereas I have heretofore, more than once, requested the Favour of all such whose Accounts have been open 12 Months on my Books to discharge them; the little Regard that has been paid to the same has been hurtful to my Credit and Scheme of Business: I therefore give this repeated Notice to the forewarned (not being able to do it personally) that if they fail paying off their respective Accounts, by the next April General-Court, I shall put such then remaining open into proper Persons Hands.

Those who are pleased to favour me with their Orders for Drugs, &c . accompanied with the Cash, will find the Prices more reasonable than if debited for them.
George Pitt . 1

The above notice is the only reference to Dr. Pitt's shop being called "Sign of the Rhinoceros."

In 1763 Dr. Pitt carried an account with Alexander Craig, Williamsburg saddler, for mending bridles, stirrup leathers, girth and crupper &c. 2

In 1764-1765 Dr. Pitt bought various items from the Printing Office next door. There were items such as quires of paper, books, ink powder, quills, lettering &c. 3

In addition to running a store in the city, Dr. Pitt was keeper of the Magazine on Duke of Gloucester Street which stored a large quantity of muskets, gunpowder &c. 4

-29-

In 1767 Dr. Pitt gave notice in the newspaper that "…little regard [had been] paid to my former request…obliges me once more to take this method, desiring all persons whose accounts are still open on my books to pay their respective balances immediately, or give their notes or bonds, with security for the same, as I am determined to go for England as soon as my affairs can be adjusted, I will dispose of my stock of drugs, medicines, and shop utensils, on reasonable terms. GEORGE PITT." 1

In November, 1767 Sarah Pitt gave detailed data in the Virginia Gazette of a lottery which had been drawn and one to follow, There were to be 97 prizes, 203 blanks making 300 tickets at 20s. each. "The goods above mentioned are specified in the Gazettes of the 12th and [blotted] When the tickets are disposed of, the drawing will be immediately after, the time and place of which will be published in the Gazette,… The money to be paid on the delivery of the tickets (or before the drawing) which are to be had of the subscriber, next door to the Post Office…" 2

Sarah Pitt's advertisement of the November 12th edition follows:

WILLIAMSBURG, Nov. 9. 1767.
THE SUBSCRIBER HAS IMPORTED IN THE Argyle , from London , a valuable assortment of millinery, and other goods, which she sells at a low price, for ready money only, viz. Six quarter and yard wide book muslin, cambricks, fine and coarse pocket handkerchiefs, black and white Barcelona and lawn bordered do. womens satin hats and bonnets, girls do, boys silk hats and caps with feathers, ribands, a great variety of agate, wax, French and pearl necklaces, earrings and sprigs, French and Italian egrets and breast flowers, skeleton wires, Scotch threads, flourishing cotton do. tapes, black and coloured ostrich feathers, womens, girls, and childrens shoes and pumps of all sorts, cotton hose, black silk mits, pins, milliners needles, common do. womens and girls coloured and plain kid gloves and mits, flowered lawn aprons, fans, India do. pearl fish and counters, silver thimbles, paste pins, ivory, tortoise shell, and horn combs, violet powder, powder boxes and puffs, toys, and several other articles. -30- She takes this opportunity to acknowledge the favours of her good customers, and hopes for a continuance of them; and to inform her friends concerned that her lottery is now completed, and will be drawn on Monday the 23d instant.
SARAH PITT. 1

On December 3, 1767 Sarah Pitt announced that " … her LOTTERY drawn on Monday last, [being encouraging] proposes another on the following scheme … drawing … to be had of the subscriber, next door to the Post Offices…" 2

Dr. Pitt went to England in the latter part of 1768 or early, 1769. Richard Floyd Pitt, a son, gave this account relating to his father's movements at that period:

…On the 12th of October , 1768, your Memorialist's Father was nominated by the Governor as the most proper Person to bring over his Dispatches at that Critical Period. And upon his arrival in England he had several Audiences with the late EARL of CHATHAM, which afforded him an Opportunity of laying before Government his finding out the Secret of making Salt-petre in Virginia , which was to have been rewarded by His Majesty's Royal Letters Patent; but the unhappy Disputes that afterwards happened, prevented the same being put into Execution, that certain Buildings had been erected for preparing the same at a very considerable Expence.
Your Memorialist's Father returned to Williamsburg, Virginia , where he continued till the late War, … [Revolutionary War] … 3

On October 6, 1768 Pitt gave notice in the Virginia Gazette:

AS I intend for Great Britain very soon, all persons indebted to me by judgments, bonds, or otherwise, are desired to pay their respective balances to Mess. Benjamin Waller , John Tazewell , and Haldenby Dixon , who are my attornies, that they may be enabled to comply with my engagements. The situation of my affairs will allow no further indulgence.
GEORGE PITT.
N.B. I have some valuable HOUSE NEGROES to sell. 4

A little later in the month, James Geddy, silversmith of Williamsburg, advertised goods to be sold "next door to the Post-Office, Williamsburg:" -31-

[October 27, 1768]

Just imported in the last ship from London, and to be sold at a low advance, by the subscriber, next door to the Post Office , Williamsburg,
A NEAT assortment of JEWELLERY, consisting of the following articles, viz . Stone and paste shoe, knee, and stock buckles, stone and plain gold brooches, hair sprigs, pins, crescents, and earrings, stone sleeve buttons and rings of all sorts, silver and pinchbeck buckles, turenne and punch ladles, thimbles, plated spurs, silver and steal [sic] watch chains and seals, &c. &c. &c.
JAMES GEDDY. 1

We do not know if Geddy was renting a shop on Pitt's property (Lot 47) or if he was on the western part of Lot 49. It could be either.

On October 27, 1768 Mrs. Pitt advertised a variety of goods for sale "Just imported from London:"

[October 27, 1768]

Just imported from London, in the Jordan, Captain Woodford, and to be sold by the subscriber in Williamsburg, at a very low advance, for ready money, the following articles, viz.

WOMENS calimanco pumps, girls do. womens leather pumps, girls do. childrens morroco sorted, womens white worsted hose, childrens spotted do. men and womens cotton hose, childrens do. of different sizes, womens black silk gloves and mitts, purple kid gloves and mitts, white kid do. white and coloured lamb gloves and mitts, girls do. satin bonnets plain and trimmed, womens and girls cloth cardinals, superfine ivory combs, horn combs with and without cases, knives sorted, neat scissors with sheaths, milliners needles, darning do. netting do. a great variety of figured and plain ribands, white and coloured fans, black and coloured sewing silks, a great assortment of threads, Balladine and Coventry do. for marking, superfine shaded cruels in grain, Jacob's ladder, powder boxes and puffs with powder, black hair plumes, white and coloured feathers, silver thimbles, a great assortment of paste pins, a great variety of the most fashionable pearl, French, and jet necklaces, earrings and sprigs, Italian egrets and breast flowers, flower hair pins, fashionable stomachers and sleeve knots, ivory pomatum eggs, Ladies small size Morocco leather cases clasps, Morrocco etwee cases with instruments complete and plated locks, do. with instruments and silver locks, a variety of pocket handkerchiefs, long lawn, pistol lawn, yard and half yard wide muslin, cambrick, diaper and Holland tape, pins, bobbin, cottons and Persians, snuff boxes, blue, nutmegs, mace, cloves, and cinnamon, a now assortment of toys, tea sets complete, soap, chocolate, loaf sugar, saltpetre, white ginger, Pitt's bitters and bitter ingredients, hair lines, and many other -32- articles too tedious to mention.
SARAH PITT. 1

No other notices of goods to be sold by Mrs. Pitt appeared prior to May 18, 1769:

[May 18, 1769]

Just imported in the JENNY, Capt . Fearon,
A VERY Genteel assortment of millinery, and other goods, which she proposes to sell at a very low advance, for ready money only, viz. Ivory thimbles, bodkins do. plain smelling bottles, engraved do. different sorts of sleeve buttons and studs, ivory and bone toothpick cases, toothpicks do. ivory eggs, teacups and saucers, coffee do. sprig nankeen blue, steel watch chains, scissors, jappaned waiters, buck wire, bows do. net hoods, purple collars and earrings, a new assortment of fashionable ribands, glossy gauze, ell wide do. dressed figured do. horn pole combs, tortoiseshell do. fine box do. tupee do. paste do. milliners needles, darning do. common do. black and white bugles, green and blue do. bugle collars, a large assortment of necklaces and earrings in the newest fashion and taste, a great variety of head and breast flowers, Italian fillets, plumes do. suits of gauze laced and plain, plain gauze caps, ruffs, tuckers, and raffles, complete, lappet caps do. Denmark do. riband stomachers, blond lace, do, with flowers, silver egrets, snail trimmings, French do. womens and girls calimanco shoes and pumps, girls morocco do. India fans, white and coloured do, mens and boys gloves, womens kid and glazed lamb do. womens worsted and cotton hose, one ounce and two ounce glass tea canisters, threads, tapes, silk laces, plain and figured stocks, Bath and brass thimbles, pearl and shell penknives, tortoiseshell do. marbles, allies, pinchbeck, Bath, and steel buckles, very genteel pocket books, dressed and undressed dolls. a great variety of paste pins, silver thimbles, cambricks, muslin, pistol lawn, long lawn, Persians, sewing silks, Chinese netting do. worsteds, black and white Barcelona handkerchiefs, womens hats and bonnets, toys, a great variety of pocket handkerchiefs, hair lines for clothes, powder boxes and puffs, umbrellas, and many other things too tedious to mention.
SARAH PITT.

N.B. As the goods are new and well chosen, I flatter myself that the Ladies will favour me with their custom, which will be gratefully acknowledged by
Their humble servant,
S.P.

2

Mrs. Pitt continued to advertise imported goods for sale in Williamsburg: -33-

[October 26, 1769]

WILLIAMSBURG, October 25 , 1769.
Just imported in the TWO SISTERS, Capt . TAYLOR, from LONDON,
A NEW ASSORTMENT OF MILLINERY and other goods, to be SOLD, at a very low advance, for ready money only, viz . a very genteel assortment of caps, ribband and chenille stomachers, a large assortment of necklaces, ear rings, and sprigs, paste, pearl, and French ditto, fancy hair pins very prettily executed, gauze ruffles, tuckers, and ruffs, a variety of egrets, flower caps and feathers, artificial and basket breast flowers, a genteel assortment of fans, paste, tortoiseshell and horn combs, ivory and box ditto, smelling-bottles, ivory bodkins, a very handsome assortment of paper boxes, pomatum eggs, and nutmeg graters, white cardinals, shades ditto, black and white bonnets, black satin cardinals, black, purple, crimson and scarlet cloth ditto, cottons, white callico and humhums, a large assortment of fashionable ribbands, satin and calimanco pumps, childrens Morocco ditto, boys shoes, silk and cotton hose, childrens ditto, silver thimbles, pins, needles, threads, tapes, bobbin, silk laces, black and white Chinese netting silk, purple, kid, and lamb gloves, plaited stocks, silk handkerchiefs, bow and bunch wire, worsteads in grain, china tea-cups, coffee-cups and saucers, Queen's ditto, double jointed spectacles in fish-skins, Irish linens, cloves, mace, nutmegs, raisins, white ginger, saltpetre, toupee irons, scates, trunks, and band boxes, and many other articles.
SARAH PITT.

N.B. I expect by the first vessels, a larger assortment of gauzes, muslins, lawns, &c. &c.

1

On December 14th, 1769 Mrs. Pitt advertised her goods again:

[December 14, 1769]

Just imported in the INDUSTRY, Captain LOWES, from LONDON, and to be SOLD at a very, low advance, for ready money only,
BLACK and Coloured bugles, a great variety of white, red, blue, and green agate, and other necklaces of different sorts and fashions, mock garnet and bead egrets, rolls for Ladies hair, fancy coloured egrets, sultan do. shaded flowers, childrens morocco pumps, black do. boys do. yard wide glossy gauze, ell wide do. muslin do. undressed do. dressed figured do. a variety of new jubilee ribands, rich black alamode, yard wide white do. Final cotton holland, tortoiseshell and horn crooked combs, paste do. shapes, ornaments, and mottoes for desserts, of different sorts and figures, womens and girls fans, flower norishers, womens silk mits, kid and lamb do. boys worsted hose, fine hair powder, boys hats, cotton and silk laces, blue harrateen for curtains, an assortment of rich black lace, white do. picket gauze parisnet, white catguts green and coloured silk purses, balladine silk, white blond thread, floss silk, fine cap wire, crimping do, a great variety of pocket handkerchiefs, lawn do. striped muslin, huckabuck, ell wide Russia linens, pistol lawns, demi cambricks of different prices, very beautiful Japan waiters of different sizes, a great variety of Queen's china for children, -34- sets complete, very good hyson and bohea tea, pepper, ginger, saltpetre, and a variety of other articles imported in the April court.
SARAH PITT.

N.B. As she has an assistant just arrived from London , who understands the millinery business, which she proposes to carry on, mounting fans, and making cardinals and bonnets, she hopes for a continuance of the Ladies custom, which shall be acknowledged as a favour.

1

Mrs. Pitt continued her business in Williamsburg noting goods "Just imported:"

[April 19, 1770]

WILLIAMSBURG, April 19, 1770.
Just imported, in the JENNY, Capt . WOODFORD, a large assortment of MILLINERY, and other GOODS, at a low advance, for ready money only, viz. CALLICOES, CHINTZES, PERSIANS, CATGUT, India chintzes, lawn handkerchiefs, coloured pullicat ditto, figured-ditto, gauze mobs, crimp'd caps with lappets, gauze fillets, neat dressed caps, puffed ditto, laced ditto, large dressed fillets and flowers, small ditto, pink and blue lined childrens caps, lace and flower caps, Italian caps, common ditto, boys black silk hats, Ostrich feathers, blue, green, and white sattin caps, gold and velvet pocket books, gold pincushions, silk and cotton laces, narrow pink, sheneal, paduasoy, and rich fashioned ribbands, nice silk purses, tapes, holland and diaper, ribband and lace stomachers, pink and white ditto, white and blue feathers, tortoiseshell combs set in paste, horn ditto in paste, ditto set in garnet, ditto in marquiset, plain horm and tortoiseshell combs of several sorts, ivory ditto, marquiset crosses and hearts set in silver, half moon pearl and marquiset fancy pins, garnet ditto, pink beads, black ditto, seed wax ditto, oval ditto, wax pearl ditto, black, white, blue, and green bugles, agate ditto, black bead and bugle collars, mother of pearl collars and earrings, dressed ditto, smelling bottles in carved and plain cases, ivory thimbles, Bath metal ditto with steel tops, very handsome steel watch chains, dandriff combs, comb brushes, gilt oval sleeve buttons, pearl buttons and studs, penknives, large and small scissars, milleners comon and darning needles, minikins, short whites and corking pins, large and small naked dolls, dressed ditto, toy tea sets, and a large variety of other toys, Ladies black furred riding hats, feathers for ditto, mens beaver and castor hats, childrens ditto laced and plain, womens, girls, mens and boys white gloves glazed and in grain, callimanco pumps, leather ditto, and shoes, womens and childrens black leather and Morocco shoes and pumps, DIDSBURY'S mens shoes and pumps, mens raw silk hose, thread ditto, boys white and brown ditto, bohea and hyson tea, single and double refined sugar, check, oznabrug, and many other articles too tedious to mention.
SARAH PITT

N.B. As she has got a millener come in, she carries on the millenery -35- business; also making of cardinals, bonnets and hats, and mounting of fans, &c. 1

In May and June, 1770 Robert Carter of Nomini Hall and Williamsburg, carried an account with Sarah Pitt for hose, ribbon, tea and &. 2

John Packe Garland, a son of Sarah Pitt by her first marriage, died in 1770 leaving a will in which he devised and bequeathed "to my friend Mr Haldenby Dixon in Trust and to and for the sole and separate use and Estate of my dearest Mother Sarah Pitt my Negro Woman Sall and her Child…[also] to my said Mother the sum of three hundred Pounds part of the Money recovered of William Green in the General Court also the sum of One hundred and eighty Pounds devised me by my Father which several Sums I desire may be paid my said Mother by my Executor hereinafter named, I give Devise and bequeath unto George Pitt son of the aforesaid George and Sarah Pitt the sum of fifty pounds other part of the Money recovered of William Green also a Negro Boy named Sam to him and his Heirs for ever … to my Godson Matthew Pitt the Sum of Fifty Pounds other part of the Money recovered of William Green…"3

Sarah Pitt continued to carry on her millinery and shop business:

[May 16, 1771]

Just IMPORTED, in the ANNE & MARY, Captain POWER, from LONDON, A NEAT and genteel Assortment of GOODS suitable for the Season, Those Gentlemen and Ladies who have been so kind as to give her their Custom, she hopes, will still favour her with a Continuance of it; and as she is obliged to sell for ready Money, they may depend upon being supplied on the most reasonable Terms.
SARAH PITT. 4

-36-

Robert Carter carried an account with Mrs. Sarah Pitt in January, 1770:

The Honble Robt Carter Esqr To Sarah Pitt
1770 Dr
Jany 19th
To 1 sett painted Tea Toys, were 2/6 £ -.2.-
To 1 pr Mugs 1/- 1 Cream boat 4d 1.4.-
To 1 pr Salts 4d 1 pr Candlesticks 1/3 1.7.-
To 1 Sett Oval Dishes 2.-.-
To 1 doz. of plates 2.6.-
To 1 Turin and Dish 1.6.-
£10:10:11

Received the Above
Sarah Pitt 1

No further notices of Mrs. Pitt's business appeared in newspapers until October, 1772:

[October 15, 1772]

Just imported in the FANNY, Capt . BARRON, and to be SOLD, by the subscriber, on reasonable terms, for ready money only ,

A LARGE assortment of GOODS, consisting of very handsome paste necklaces and earrings, marcasite, wax, and coal ditto, handsome paste collars, solitaires and sprigs, paste sleeve buttons, gilt ditto, sets of buttons for stomachers, silver papboats, coral and bells, garnet, and marcasite hoops, lockets ditto, childrens watches and equipages, curious watch trinkets for Ladies, very genteel dress and undress fancy caps, and others, hair rolls, drop curls, &c. very fine point, blond point, mecklenburg, and minionet laces, striped and figured sattins and lustrings for sacks and coats, ditto for bonnets, silver blond for trimmings, children's fillets and quarter caps, womens blue, green, and red morocco turned pumps, womens and girls black leather shoes and pumps, fashionable stomachers and breast flowers, garnet, coal and Italian egrets, gold loops, bands, and buttons, smelling bottles, pin cushion trunks, and Gentlemens pocket books, of all prices, a large quantity of womens and girls quilts, a variety of pretty cottons and calicoes, copperplate and fancy chintzes, Chinese and other handkerchiefs, very fine bohea and hyson tea, the famous Norris's drops, hungary, Madden's oil, capers, ginger, spices, blue, hair powder, cloth cardinals, ditto sattin with and without bonnets, Gentlemens lace and worsted ruffles, Ladies ditto, and many other articles.
SARAH PITT. 2

-37-

November 12th, 1772 issues of the Virginia Gazette (both Purdie & Dixon and William Rind) carried obituary notices of the death of Mrs. Sarah Pitt:

WILLIAMSBURG, November 12.
LAST Monday died Mrs. SARAH PITT, Spouse to Doctor George Pitt, of this City; who bore a tedious Illness with much Christian Patience and Resignation, and was a Lady of a very amiable Character. 1
WILLIAMSBURG, November 12.
Last Monday morning died, in the 47th year of her age, Mrs. SARAH PITT, whose many virtues through every varied scene of private life did honour to the principles she professed. Taught, by early experience, that afflictions and disappointments were the lot of humanity, her constant study was to rise superior to them by a humble acquiescence to the dispensations of Providence. Her bosom "tremblingly alive" to every tender sentiment of connubial and maternal affection, she discharged the duties of the wife and mother in such a distinguished manner as must make her memory revered, and her loss forever regretted, by each of those relations. Prudence guided every action of her life, and blessed with an uncom [next page missing]2

Mrs. Pitt's will - written in 1771 - was proved in York County on the 17th of May, 1773. She mentioned her late son, John Packe Garland; her-sons: Richard, William and Thomas Pitt, and her daughter, Mary. Full details follow in the complete will:

IN THE NAME OF GOD AMEN. I Sarah Pitt Wife of George Pitt of the City of Williamsburg Surgeon being weak in Body but of a perfect and Sound mind do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following Viz. I being possessed of a Negro Woman Slave named Sall and her Child named Amey, in my own Right and independent of my Husband as will more fully appear by the Will of my late Son John Pack Garland and Recorded in York County Court IMPRIMIS I do give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Pitt my Negro Girl Amey (Daughter of the above named Sall) and her future increase to her and her heirs

ITEM. It is my desire that my Negro Woman Sall be hired out until my Son Richard Pitt come to the Age of Twenty one Years then She and her increase after this date be appraised and if my Son Richard chooses he may have her, and her increase at what three good and disinterested Men shall say they or she may be worth He paying the Money at the time she shall be so appraised but if he cannot, or do not choose to pay the Money for the said Sall and her increase Then it is my desire that the said Sall and her increase -38- if any after this date shall be sold and the Money to be equally divised amongst my three Sons Viz. Richard Pitt William Pitt and Thos Pitt- but if my Daughter Mary dies before she comes of lawful Age or Marry's then I desire that the Negro Girl Amey may be sold and also her increase if any And the Money to be equally divided amongst all my surviving Children that I have had by George Pitt. I do hereby constitute and appoint my Friend Mr Haldenby Dixon Executor of this my Will to which I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this twenty ninth day of July one thousand Seven hundred and Seventy One
SARAH PITT (L.S.)

Signed Sealed, Published)
and declared before us )
John Dixon
Ro: Prentis

Codicil to the above Will
The within named Negro Woman Sall (with her Child born since the making and Signing the above Will) Is by me sold to Mr Robert Hart for the sum of Eighty Pounds current Money, Therefore it is my Will and desire that the Money may be equally divided amongst my aforesaid three Sons Richard William and Thomas Pitt. If any of my last mentioned three sons die before they come of lawful Age, then I desire that the Money (which Sall and her last Child sold for), may be equally divided or go to the Survivor or Survivors of my said three sons…this twenty first Day of February one thousand seven hundred and seventy two.
SARAH PITT (L.S.)

At a Court held for York County the 17th Day of May 1773. This Will was proved by the Oath of John Dixon a Witness thereto…and ordered to be recorded.
Teste Thos Everard Cl: Cur: 1

The Virginia Gazette of November 11, 1773 carried a notice of Dr. George Pitt concerning goods on hand which he wished to sell:

WILLLAMSBURG, November 11, 1773.
THE subscriber has on hand about eight or nine hundred pounds sterling worth of GOODS, which he will dispose of on reasonable terms.--It will be taken kind in those who have neglected paying their balances to my attornies during my being in England, if they will now pay them to me, as I have suffered much by such neglect. No further indulgence can be expected .
GEORGE PITT. 2

This notice is in the same vein as former notices except that it shows that Pitt's store was large (around £900 worth of goods) and that he -39- had made a trip to England recently. These goods for sale, probably, represented the store goods of Mrs. Sarah Pitt, lately deceased.

Dr. Pitt according to his son's account had resided in Williamsburg "upwards of 30 Years, [and] acquired as well by his Profession, as by trading in British Manufactures, a considerable Fortune Independent of his Wives, to the Amount at least of £4OOO;…" 1 Now, that his wife was dead, adjustments would have to be made. He continued to act as keeper of the Public Magazine until the opening of hostilities between England and the American colonies, at which time he fled to England with his family. 2

We suspect that Dr. Pitt had planned, perhaps, a quick exit if ever it became necessary to leave Williamsburg. The following notices in the Virginia Gazette indicate that he was trying to sell of his stock of goods:

WILLIAMSBURG, April 26, 1774.
THE subscriber being under a necessity of returning to England the ensuing summer, will sell off his remaining STOCK of GOODS at a low advance to a wholesale purchaser; and desires all persons indebted to him to pay off their respective balances immediately that his affairs may be properly adjusted before his departure.
GEORGE PITT. 3
WILLIAMSBURG, September 2, 1774.
THE subscriber, who is immediately going for England , desires all persons indebted to him, by bond or otherwise, to pay what they owe to Mr. Robert Prentis , of this city, who is properly empowered as attorney for
GEORGE PITT. 4

The Prentis MS Papers indicate that "George Pitt was paid a salary as storekeeper to the Magazine, from April 25th 1773 to this Day [Augt 1774] at £20 pr Annum----£23.13.4." 5 [The above order given by Dunmore to the -40- Treasurer of Virginia on May 13, 1775.]

According to Dr. Pitt's son's account his father "returned to Williamsburg where he continued till the late War, and at the breaking out of Disturbances, the Americans, applied to him to surrender to them the Possession of the magazine and Stores, which he refused at the Risque of his Life; and upon such Refusal they took Possession by Force of Arms, and declared [his] Father and himself Traitors to their Constitution and were thereupon obliged to act defensively." 1

On August 17, 1774 Dr. Pitt gave a deed of conveyance of Lot 47 to John Dixon,2 bookseller, and part-owner of the printing office next door:

[August 17, 1774]

[Dr. George Pitt, merchant, Williamsburg,
to
John Dixon, bookseller,
Consideration: £650 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the Seventeenth Day of August … [1774] BETWEEN George Pitt of the City of Williamsburg Merchant of the one part and John Dixon of the same place Bookseller of the other part Witnesseth that for and in Consideration of the Sum of Six hundred and fifty pounds Current Money by the said John to the said George in hand paid at or before the Sealing and delivery of these presents …the said George Pitt hath granted Bargained sold aliened enfeoffed and confirmed … unto the said John Dixon and his Heirs and assigns forever all that Lot of Land lying and being in the said City of Williamsburg and denoted in the plan thereof by the Numbers or Figures 47 Bounded on the North by Nicolson [sic] Street on the East by Lots of William Hunter whereon the Printing Office now stands on the South by Duke of Gloucester Street and on the West by a Small Lane being the Lot formerly sold and conveyed by Benjamin Bailey to the said George Pitt by Indenture bearing date the twenty first day of December…[1758] and Recorded in the County of York and all Houses Buildings Yards Gardens Woods Ways Waters Profits Commodities Hereditaments and Appurtenances to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof and all the Estate Right Title Interest Property Claim and Demand of him the said George Pitt of -41- in and to the same and every part thereof TO HAVE AND TO HOLD all and Singular the said Lot of Land and Premises unto the said John Dixon … forever. IN WITNESS whereof the Parties to these presents have hereunto interchangeably set their Hands and affixed their Seals the day and year first above written
G. PITT. (L.S.) 1

[Recorded York County Court January 16, 1775]

This concludes the affairs of Dr. George Pitt in Williamsburg with the exception of a short inventory in 1776. Dr. Pitt was in England at the time of his death-so, all of his houses and lots had been sequestered on account of his Loyalist views. However rum, brands and an old saddle amounting to the paltry sum of £21.8.0 was the total inventory and appraisement turned into York County Court in October, 1776 by J. Dixon, Robert Prentis and William Pierce. 2

Early in 1775, John Dixon conveyed the above described property known as "Lot 47" to William Hunter, owner of Lot 48 on which the printing office was located:

[February 13, 1775]

[John Dixon and Rosanna his wife,
to
William Hunter, Williamsburg,
Consideration: £650 Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the thirteenth day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy five BETWEEN John Dixon and Rosanna his [sic] of the City of Williamsburg of the one part and William Hunter of the same city of the other part, WITNESSETH that for and in consideration of the sum of six hundred and fifty pounds current money by the said William to the said John in hand paid at or before the sealing and delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof he doth hereby acknowledge … he the said John Dixon hath granted bargained sold aliened enfeoffed and confirmed … unto the said William Hunter and his heirs and Assigns forever all that Lot of Land lying and being in the said City of Williamsburg and denoted in the plan thereof by the Numbers or figures 47 bounded on the North by Nicholson Street, on the East by the Lots of William Hunter whereon the printing Office now stands, on the South by Duke of Gloucester Street and on the West by a small Lane being the Lot formerly sold and conveyed by George Pitt -42- to the said John Dixon by Indenture bearing date the seventeenth day of August … [1774] and Recorded in the County Court of York And all Houses Buildings Yards Gardens Woods Ways Waters Profits commodities Hereditaments & appurtenances to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining & the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof and all the Estate Right Title Interest property claim & demand of him the said John Dixon of in and to the same and every part thereof TO HAVE AND TO HOLD all and singular the said Lot of Land and premises unto the said William Hunter and his heirs and Assigns…
IN WITNESS whereof the parties to these presents have hereunto interchangeably set their Hands and Affixed their Seals the day and year first above Written.

John Dixon (L.S.)
Rosanna Dixon (L.S.)

At a Court held for York County 20th Feby 1775
This Indenture was acknowledged by John Dixon and Rosanna his Wife parties thereto she having been first privily examined as the Law directs and Ordered to be Recorded Teste Thos Everard Cl: Cur. 1

In the above quoted indentures the lot is mentioned by number as "Lot 47" and the boundaries much the same as formerly described in other indentures except that it is the first time that the western boundary line is given as "by a small Lane." This would seem to indicate that prior to this, there was no lane or street between Lots 46 and 47.

Hunter married his cousin, Elizabeth Hunter Davenport, in December, 1776 and lived at Lot 47 for a time.

In 1777 Hunter had Humphrey Harwood, local brick mason and builder, make certain repairs for him. As Hunter was owner of two lots (47 & 48), one cannot ascertain on which lot the changes were made, though, doubtless, some may have been to his dwelling or other buildings on Lot 47. 2

In December, 1777 the property was offered for sale: -43-

[December 5, 1777]

To be SOLD or RENTED, and may be entered on the first Day of JANUARY, THE Dwelling-House adjoining Dixon & Hunter's Printing Office; there is a good Garden, well paled in, a good Stable and Chair House, and all other necessary Outhouses. For Terms inquire of the Printers of this Paper. 1

July, 1778 finds Hunter advertising the houses and lots for sale:

[July 17, 1778]

FOR SALE
THE HOUSES and LOTS where the subscriber now lives. Possession to be given the lst of November . The Terms will be made to suit the purchaser.
WILLIAM HUNTER. 2

The Frenchman's Map of Williamsburg (1782) shows houses on each of the lots owned by William Hunter. 3 On what appears to be Lot 47 there is a large house flush to the street, two outhouses to the rear and a house at the extreme northern part of the lot.

Hunter was a Loyalist. Towards the end of the Revolutionary War he joined Cornwallis's forces. A letter from Cornwallis affirms this statement:

Culford Augst 30th 1784
I certify that Mr. William Hunter joined the army under my command at Williamsburgh in Virginia, and rendered special service by procuring intelligence of the Enemy, & by every other means in his power; and that He afterwards bore arms at the siege of Yorktown in a Company of Volunteers. He has sacrificed his fortune to his Loyalty, and He is now, I believe, in the greatest want of temporary Subsistance.
Cornwallis. 4

When Hunter fled following the surrender at Yorktown, he went to New York, Nova Scotia and finally in 1784 reached England from which place he gave his "Memorials" for his sequestered property in Williamsburg. However, shortly after he left Williamsburg, he made his father-in-law, Joseph Davenport, -44- his attorney in Virginia, conveying to him be deed of trust his Virginia property which included the two lots in Williamsburg. Hunter's two sons, William and Joseph Hunter, were under age at the time. The conveyance follows:

[July 11, 1782]

[William Hunter of Williamsburg,
to
Joseph Davenport of the County of York,
Consideration: £l Current Money of Virginia]

THIS INDENTURE made the eleventh day of July in the Year of our LORD [1782] BETWEEN William Hunter late of the City of Williamsburg of the one part and Joseph Davenport Clerk of the County of York of the other part WITNESSETH that for and in consideration of the sum of One pound, Current Money by the said Joseph Davenport to the sd William Hunter in hand paid,…he the said William Hunter HATH granted, bargain'd, sold, aliend and confirmed, and by these presents DOTH grant bargain … unto the said Joseph Davenport his Heirs and Assigns, all those Houses Tenements and lots … lying and being in the said City of Williamsburg bounded as follows to wit on the south side by the main street on the West by the Street running between the Said Lots and those of Robert Prentis on the north by the Back Street between the sd Lots and those of Elizabeth Hay Widow and on the East by the Lots if Sarah Waters Widow and known in the Plan of the said City by the Numbers 47 & [blank]… TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said Lots & Tenements Lands, & all other his said estate … unto the said Joseph Davenport in trust for the Benefit of the Children of the said William Hunter, namely William & Joseph Hunter … for ever … IN WITNESS whereof the Parties to these presents have hereunto set their Hands & affixed their Seals the day and year above written.

WILLIAM HUNTER (L.S)
JOSEPH DAVENPORT (L.S) 1
[Recorded York County Court, July 15, 1782]

Hunter stated five years later (1787) that "what real estate he had he saved by conveying them safe to his Wifes Father, & he had Interest enough to preserve it for his [Hunter's] children." 2

In Hunter's claims for losses suffered in Virginia by the Revolution, he valued his two lots in Williamsburg as follows: -45-

1 House and Lott in the City of Williamsburg N 47 £600 Virginia Curr.
1 Ditto Ditto N 48 650 " "
Household & Kitchen Furniture in Value about 500 1

Lot 47 was further described by Hunter in this way. "This was bought [he says] by his Guardian John Dixon in 1774- on his Acct for £650 Cury and conveyed to him on his coming of Age. Values it at this Sum." 2

In 1789, upon the death of Joseph Davenport with whom Hunter had left his property in trust for the benefit of his two sons, William and Joseph, (under age), Hunter "now of the City of London … in Consequence of the death of the said Joseph Davenport, hereby renews and conveys the same Trust and Power [of Attorney] before mentioned to William Davenport son of the aforesaid Joseph Davenport." 3

From 1782 to 1805 Lots 47 & 48 were taxed to William Hunter or to his estate.4

From the Williamsburg Land Tax Records, it appears that Robert Greenhow 5 obtained Lot 47 from William Hunter's estate in 1805: "1 lot with annual valuation of $50." 6 (An insurance policy for a storehouse on Lot 49 in 1796 stated that William Hunter was owner of Lot 48 then; but another policy on the same property in 1806 mentioned Robert Greenhow as owner of lot to east.) 7

-46-

The Bucktrout Map of Williamsburg (1807) shows "Hunter" on Lot 47. 1

Tax transfers for Williamsburg in 1815 indicate that Dr. [Anthony] Dufort bought property "via Robert Greenhow, house and lot in Williamsburg bounded on the east by another lot of the said Greenhow and by Cary Drumond's lot west." 2

In 1816 the brick storehouse [on Lot 48] is bounded in a deed of conveyance to Samuel Shield, Jr. thus:

…the lot whereof is bounded on the east by the land which separates it from the House Occupied by Doctor ---- Dufort, on the South by the Main Street, on the West by the lot late in the Occupation of Lucy L. Paradise deed, & on the north by ---- street, and which is the same House and Lot Sold to the said Robert H. Warburton by William Prentis and Mary his Wife… 3

Williamsburg Land Tax lists for 1817 give: "Anthy Dufort ---- 1 lot ---- $100." In 1818 and 1819 he is charged with "1 lot ---- $178." 4

In 1820 Joseph Dufort's estate is charged with "1 lot & buildings $1100 Formerly charged in the name of Anthony Dufort's estate." 5

From 1821 to 1825 Joseph Dufort's estate is recorded as in 1820. In 1825 James Davis, Jr. comes into possession of the property formerly Dufort's: "1 lot and buildings $1100 Via Joseph Repitan devise of Joseph A. Dufort." 7

-47-

James Davis, Jr. or his estate, apparently., owned the property from this date until 1851. (to follow chronologically in the report) James Davis, Jr. was deceased in 1841. Charlotte Davis [widow] and William, an infant, were heirs. 1

In 1832 James Davis had Richard T. Booker, carpenter, make certain repairs to his property:

Mr. James Davis [Jr.]
To Richard T. Booker
1832 Dr
May 5th To making pair box steps Tread 4/6 each $2.25
" repairing back steps and putting new tread
" furnishing and putting up 24 ft featheredge plank @ 2 cts per foot1.00
" furnishing and preparing moulding for porch 1.50
" repairing three pannels of pales in yard 12 1/2 ea 37 1/2
" furnishing 16 pannels pales .16
" fastening up looking Glass .50
" churn staff and two clappers .75
$7.83 2

Another account for repairs charged to Captain James Davis for work done by Richard T. Booker, local carpenter, follows:

Captain James Davis
1835 Dr
feb 12 To 25 feet 3 x 4 Scantling w 4¢ foot $1. making 2 cellar door frames $3.50 $4.50
To fitting & hanging 2 doors @ 50¢ $1/ putting up 35 pannels pails @ 37 ½ p pannel $12.12 ½ 13.12
$17.62 ½
To 16 pannel door $3. timber for Same $1.50 4.50
$22.12
Oct:16 To repairing grate for Chamber $ .50
3 new bars for ditto 10 lb[?] 1.05
Dec.15 pair hook & eye hinges & Nails .75
$2.30
1835 D.
feb:12 To 2 hooks 25¢ 3 spike nails 12 inches long 25¢ $ .50
-48-
Mar 3 " 6 nails to put on lock 13¢ (27) 2 hooks for hinges & nails 38¢.51
June10 " Making latch & Ketch for gate 44¢ .44
1836
May 20 To 12 hooks and 24 staples 1.50
June 11 To 2 plates for pump, nails & putting on 1.50
$4:45 1

In 1842 the estate of Davis was reassessed thus: "1 lot ---- $1500; lot & bldgs $1700 Reassessed by the Commissioner of Revenue, additional buildings having been added." 2

From 1844-1852 items in the Southall Papers indicate that Southall was managing the Davis property. There were amounts paid for debts and for mortgages, it seems: "1844 July 15-24 Henry C. Semple. Dr To Cash, This sum advanced Mrs Davis for his due bill for rent due 1 July '44----$18.75;" "1847 Edward A. Semple--To George W. Southall By Davis' house & lot for decree in his favor for $74-35 [and] pr Credit on his bond $74.35;" "1847 April 1 Paid Davis' House & Lot Cash pd R. M. Bucktrouts claims decreed 11 July 1846--$37.08;" "1847 May 31 Paid Davis' House & Lot. To Sundries cash. Paid S & M's debt $51.00 do… $20.67 do… J. C. Sheldon $5.06 ---- $76.73;" "1847 April 28 (Paid] Davis' House & Lot. Cash paid Ro: H. Armistead admor &c of Ro: B. Travis' amount decreed to him ---- $46.38;" "l848 Mar 31, Paid Davis House & Lot. Sundry claims pd R McC. atty as pr rect----$263-43 [and] 1850 Jan 4, Cash Accounts: Davis House & Lot Paid Bowman amt decreed him ---- $5.90." 3

By 1846 Mrs. Charlotte Davis, widow of James Davis, Jr., was renting out rooms. Southall, Williamsburg lawyer, seemed to be handling this business: -49-

Received of James J. Drake, by George W. Southall, Ten Dollars in full of claims against him for rent including the payment due the first October 1846, for rent of room, and settling rent of Kitchen, Smoke house & garden to 23d October 1846.

Charlotte A. Davis
3d Oct. 1846
James J Drake. To Charlotte Davis
To rent of room rented by Banks to payments due 1 July, Augt & Sept, & Oct $4.00
To rent of Kitchen, Smokehouse & garden
3 payments due 23 Augt Sept & Oct -- 5.50
$9.50
Cr: paid as above ----- $10.00
50 Bal due Drake & Banks owes for 2 months 25 each making 50¢ . 1

In 1848 Dickie Galt seems to have been renting some of the Davis property:

Mr. D Galt
To S. T. Bowman
1848Dr
JanuaryTo bricking up fire place and putting up Stove in Dining room $2.00
" ½ bushel whitewash 2/3 .38
" repairing well 12/ 2.00
Febry
22nd " mending plastering and whitewashing two rooms 15/ 2.50
" 23 yds of plastering @ 21/ 7.51
" raising fireplace and putting in crane 1.50
" eye for Crane bought of Linsey .90
April " plastering around door 6/ 1.00
$17.79

Sept 17 1851 pd the whole of the above by D Galt S T Bowman

[endorsed on back in Southall's handwriting] "Sherod T. Bowman's Account for work at Davis' House & lot occupied by D. Galt."2

In 1852 Southall gave a check to Virginia Fire and Marine Insurance Company for premium on a policy on Davis's "Houses from 14 March 1851 to 14 March 1852 ---- $23.75."3

-50-

Williamsburg Land Tax records indicate that Charlotte Davis was given a life tenure in her husband's property. 1 She is listed with the property from 1851 to 1861 (when the Land Tax records cease).

According to a story in A Williamsburg Scrap Book 2(1932), Mrs. Davis nee Charlotte Bingham, claimed to be of royal descent:

…Mrs. James Davis nee Charlotte Bingham, told everyone that she was the great-granddaughter of an English princess married to a Danish king. The king was in every way unworthy of the name. He treated his queen cruelly; she, after suffering the greatest injustices, made her escape from the court and with the assistance of English friends came out to the colony of Virginia disguised as a lady's maid. She never went into details of the story; possibly she knew no more, or, knowing more, considered that was enough.

History throws a little more light on this remarkable story. If we go back three generations from the time in which Mrs. Davis lived, we come to the reign of George III. His youngest sister, Caroline Matilda was married to Christian VII, King of Denmark. He is described as a small weak man who treated his queen with great cruelty. Soon tiring of her, he spent most of his time travelling in foreign countries. Returning on one occasion, he brought in his suite a German physician named Sturmsee. This man enjoyed his master's inmost confidence and soon gained that of the young queen, who sought by this means to be reconciled to the king. Sturmsee was hated by the queen-mother and other members of the royal family. They contrived to overthrow him, procuring a warrant for his execution from the king, and involved the innocent young queen in his ruin.

Sturmsee was executed, and Caroline Matilda would have been also but for the appearance in the Baltic Sea of a British fleet under the command of Keith, by whom she was carried off to Zelle where she is said to have died neglected and unhappy in 1775.

It is not impossible that instead of dying at that time, she was smuggled out to this country. We have only tradition to fill in the missing link. It says she feigned death and was brought out of Zelle in a coffin, presumably to be taken back to England. From there, disguised as a lady's maid she sailed for Virginia where she was met by a lover who had taken the name of Druid. They were married and lived together happily. 3

-51-

She passed her last days, according to the story, at the Repiton House in Williamsburg - destitute and looked after by the women of the community.

There was some connection between Joseph Dufort, Joseph Repiton and the Davis family. 1 Another interesting fact is that a Mrs. Bingham was living in Williamsburg in 1822 2 and an Elizabeth Bingham died in Williamsburg in 1851. 3 Could Mrs. Bingham have been Mrs. Charlotte Bingham Davis's mother?

Because nineteenth century court records for Williamsburg and James City County were destroyed by fire during the Civil War, it is well nigh impossible to follow through on this story.

By 1856 the Barziza 4 family was living in the Davis house. Boundary lines for Lot 48 give Barziza as on the West and North.5 Barziza, evidently, bought the property from Mrs. Charlotte Davis. However, no court records are extant to prove the date as records were destroyed in the Civil War.

In 1880 Phillipa Barziza of Harris County, Texas, conveyed property -52- in Williamsburg "…once occupied by the Barziza family and by Mrs. Davis" to J. W. Wilkinson. The consideration named was $650 and the description was "… All that property land or lots in the City of Williamsburg,…on the corner of Main or Duke of Gloucester Street and Colonial Street, including the premises once occupied by the Barziza family and by Mrs. Davis - together with all improvements …" 1

The father of Phillippa Barziza, Philip Ignatius Barziza, had been Master of the Botetourt Masonic Lodge, Williamsburg in 1820, and again in 1824. 2 He paid Personal Property Taxes in the city from 1820 to 1859, 3 In 1854-1857 his two sons, D. U. and P. I., Jr., attended William and Mary College and lived at home. 4 Barziza at one time was Keeper at the Eastern State Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg.

Mr. John S. Charles, an old citizen of Williamsburg, in his "Recollections of Williamsburg" during the Civil War period, gave this description of what appears to have been Lot 47:

On the southwest corner of the square bounded by Duke of Gloucester, Nicholson, Colonial and Botetourt streets, there was a long rambling, two story frame dwelling with three doors opening out upon Duke of Gloucester street. The upper story of this house had a small platform with railing around it, with steps down to the street; the other two doors were reached by steps directly from the street. 5

Mrs. Victoria M. Lee, a late inhabitant of Williamsburg described this part of Williamsburg as she recalled it ca. 1861:

A small, frame building, used as a shop, stood on the site -53- of the present furniture store. Just west of this building was a frame, story and a half house, also used as a shop. In 1862, a Hebrew by the name of Mordecai Hofheimer ran this shop. It may be that there were two shops between Hofheimer's store and the "Widow's Retreat" (site of the present Pitt-Dixon House) but after seventy years I can't be sure. However, I am sure that if there were buildings there, they were both small and a story and a half high. A shoe shop was kept by Mr. Walthall (in building on Lot 48) in one of these buildings - the one furthest west, i.e., the one nearest the "Widow's Retreat."

On the corner of this block that is on the site of Ned Debrick's [Debriss] house which was wrecked a year or so ago, was a very long house which Mr. Sidney Smith used to call "Widow's Retreat" because it was occupied by four widows. This was a story and a half building with four entrances opening onto Duke of Gloucester street…1

Edward Debress was a negro teamster. 2 In 1890 Debress was conveyed a part of Lot 47 by J. W. Wilkinson 3 He was living on this property in 1898. 4

Mrs. Charlotte Davis paid land tax on the property until 1861 when the land tax records cease. 5 She paid personal property tax from 1842 on "1 watch, 1 clock and some plate" until 1854. From 1855 to 1861 her name was listed but no tax was listed against her. We do not know when she sold the house - doubtless much mortgaged and encumbered by debt.

In April, 1896 a fire consumed several houses on this block. The Virginia Gazette of April 25, gave this account:

IN ASHES.
TEN HOUSES BURNED SUNDAY.
About 3 a.m. Sunday, the people were aroused from their slumbers by the cry of fire, and in an incredibly short time nearly -54- the whole population of the town was at the scene of the conflagration. Those first upon the ground saw the flames bursting from the rear of the frame storehouse of Mrs. Delia Braithwaite. 1 In a few minutes the fire had communicated with the adjoining buildings on either side of Mrs. Braithwaite's house….
West of where the fire originated the work of destruction was going on. The fire swept everything in its path, and only by heroic work was it stopped at Colonial street. Three houses were destroyed in this space, making a total of ten besides outbuildings. The largest loser was Samuel Harris,2 whose loss is certainly not less than $10,000…. Ned Debris, colored, had no insurance and is a heavy loser. Jim Wilkinson, colored, house burned, no insurance…3

The chain of title to the property prepared in 1930 by Channing M. Hall for Williamsburg Holding Corporation quotes a deed of trust from James W. Wilkinson and wife to R. L. Henley, trustee, dated January 20, 1896:

…ALL that certain lot of land situate on Duke of Glouster Street in the City of Williamsburg, and State of Virginia, together with the buildings thereon, fronting 41 feet on Duke of Gloucester Street and running back to Nicholson Street, bounded as follows:- On the North by Nicholson Street, on the East by the lot of Edward Debress, on the South by Duke of Gloucester Street, and on the West by Colonial Street, being one-half of the lot formerly owned by Philip Barzeza4

To revert to 1880, a deed of date October 9th indicates that Phillipa L. Barziza conveyed to James W. Wilkinson:

…All that property, land or lots in the City of Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, on the corner of Main or Duke of Gloucester Street and Colonial Street, including the premises once occupied by the Barziza family and by Mrs. Davis - together with all improvements thereon… 5

In 1890 James W. Wilkinson and wife, conveyed to Edward Debress a part of the property: -55-

…All that certain portion of the lot and house on and in which he now resides, situate on Duke of Gloucester Street in the City of Williamsburg, being a portion of lot and house which the James W. Wilkinson by deed dated the 9th day of Oct. 1880 purchased from Phillippa L. Barziza…and bounded as follows- North by a back Street, South by Duke of Gloucester Street, fronting forty (40) feet on same, West by lot of said Wilkerson, and East by lot belonging to the estate of Joseph Walthall… 1

The estate of J. W. Wilkinson is charged with a lot on East Duke of Gloucester Street, assessed at $500 with buildings, in 1929.2

In 1930 the heirs of Wilkinson noted as Cameron C. Wilkinson and wife, James H. Wilkinson and wife, Charles S. Wilkinson and wife, conveyed said land to Williamsburg Holding Corporation noting that it was the property of which J. W. Wilkinson died seized and possessed, and which was conveyed to the said J. W. Wilkinson by Phillippa Barziza, by deed dated October 9, 1880 … 3

The Debress part of the lot was involved in a suit in chancery. In March, 1907 Edward Debress died intestate seized of a lot of land fronting on Duke of Gloucester Street and running to Nicholson Street with a frontage on said street of approximately 50 feet, with two small tenant houses on the Nicholson Street end …. 4 Willie Debress and Norman Baker died seized and possessed of the Edward Debress property in 1928.

Following another chancery suit F. R. Savage acquired the lot and ascertained the fair value to be $5000.00. On July 16, 1928 Ashton Dovell, special commissioner and F. R. Savage and wife, conveyed to W. A. R. Goodwin representing Williamsburg Holding Corporation. 5

Footnotes

^1. See: Illustration #3, Appendix, for further biographical data on the Timson family.
^1. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, pp. 109-110.
^2. See page 42 of this report for indication that Colonial Street may have been opened ca. 1775.
^1. York County Records.. Deeds III., pp. 186-188, Recorded July 15, 1717.
^2. See: Illustration #3 for biographical notes.
^1. York County Records.. Deeds & Bonds III.. pp, 228-229 (Release Deed); Lease Deed, p. 228 (Sept. 2, 1717).
^2. Little is known about Freeman. He was a "Joyner" or carpenter in York County.
^1. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, pp. 276-277.
^2. Blair's storehouse was located on Lot 46. See: House History, Research Department
^3. Gill was located on Lot 49. See: House History, Research Department.
^1. See: Illustration #3 for biographical sketch.
^1.York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, pp, 290-291.
^1. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III., pp. 288-290.
^1. The London Diary of William Byrd (1717-1721), ed. by Louis B. Wright and Marion Tinling (Oxford University Press, 1958) P. 402.
^2. Ibid., p. 525.
^* See deed Jones to de Graffenreid - [on] p. 10.
^3. Archer was located at Lot 48, See: House History, Research Department, entitled "The Printing Office" by Mary Goodwin (1952).
^1. York County Records Deeds & Bonds III, pp. 378-379; Lease deed Deed Release dated February 19 17, 1721/22. Recorded Feb. 19, 1721/22.
^2. See: Illustration #3 for detailed data on De Graffenried.
^1. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds, III 384-385; Lease Deed, Ibid., 386.
^2. See: Illustration #3 for further details.
^3. The London Diary of William Byrd, ed. by Wright and Tinling (1958) pp. 494-495, p. 503. (Jan 4 & 5; March 5 & 6, 1721)
^4. See: Virginia Gazette.
^5. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, p. 343: John Davis to Ch: DeGraffenried Lot 175; Ibid., p. 398: Samuel Cobbs to Ch: DeGraffenried Lot 235. Deed states that De Graffenried is "Dancing Master."
^1. White was located in 1734/5 at Lot 55. See: House History Research Department.
^2. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds 13:1, pp. 483-484: Release Deed; Lease Deed Ibid., p. 483, June 11, 1728.
^1. This part of the lot was still in the ownership of Samuel Hyde.
^2. Richard Packe was a watchmaker in Williamsburg. The first reference to Packe which the writer could locate was in the Jones Papers (1649-1889), Library of Congress; (microfilm, Research Department). Richard King is charged in 1725-1727 with "gaming losses at cards and billiard-----£5.5.6."
^1. York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, pp. 501-503.
^1. York County Records, Deeds IV, pp. 8-9.
^2. MS Ledger John Mercer II (ca 1725-1732) p.33. Bucks County Historical Society; (microfilm, Research Department).
^3. York County Records, Orders & Wills #17, p. 167.
^4. Ibid., pp. 326.
^1. York County Records, Land Cases 1746-1769, pp. 32-33.
^1.Virginia Gazette, Hunter, ed., June 17, 1737.
^2. Ibid, March 1, 1738.
^3. Ibid July 14, 1738.
^4. Under April 18, 1745 in Virginia Gazette this same notice appeared.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Hunter, ed., March 27, 1746. When Pendleton returned to the General Court in 1752 he did not stay with Mrs. Packe but at James Taylor's, a tailor, "Just below the Church." (Ibid., March 12, 1752)
^2. York County Records, Judgements & Orders, #1, (1746-1752), pp. 192, 197.
^1. York County Records, Deeds V, PP. 374-375.
^2. Ibid., Wills & Inventories #20, p. 183.
^3. Pennsylvania Gazette, July 12, 1750.
^4. York County Records, Wills & Inventories #20, pp. 323-326.
^1. York County Records, Judgments & Orders, #4 (1746-1752), p. 339.
^2. Ibid., Deeds V. P. 428 (May 19, 1751).
^3. Virginia Gazette, March 28, 1755.
^4. York County Records, Deeds VI, pp. 31-33.
^1. Virginia Gazette, April 11, 1755.
^2. Vestry Book of St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia (1706-1786) p. 316: "at a vestry for Sept, 30, 1751 "Widow Garland" is noted. Ibid. Feb. 15, 1743: "John Garlands Orphans" have taxable land in the Parish.
^3. York County Records, Deeds VI, pp. 215-219: deed of trust indenture of Oct. 10 1759 by George Pitt to William Cowne, John Quarles and George Webb, stated that Pitt was guardian to the children of John Garland, decd., namely John Packe and Elizabeth Garland.
^1. MS Account Book of Alexander Craig, Williamsburg harness and saddle maker on loan to Research Department, p. 116.
^2. Ibid.
^3. PRO.254, A.0. 13/32 Survey Records 2396. (Microfilm., Research Department), from London records office. See: Illustration #5 for complete copy.
^4. York County Records, Wills & Inventories XXII, p. 62.
^5. York County Records, Wills & Inventories XX, pp. 512-513, See Illustration #4 for complete copy.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Hunter, ed., April 22, 1757.
^2. Colonel Thomas Moore of King William County, Virginia, was a merchant and wealthy plantation owner. He, evidently, was in some sort of partnership with Pitt as he had loaned him money. He and William Biers had a similar arrangement in 1767, Biers was a merchant in Williamsburg but removed to King William County. (Virginia Gazette Purdie & Dixon, eds., April 13, 1769.) In 1760 Moore rented one of Washington's houses in Williamsburg, (Diaries of George Washington, Vol. I., P. 157, edited by John C. Fitzpatrick; 1925.)
^3. York County Records, Judgments & Orders III, p. 60.
^4. Ibid., p. 71.
^5. Little could be found about Benjamin Bailey. One notice in the Virginia Gazette in which the names of many merchants were signers re a meeting in Williamsburg, carried the name of Benjamin Bailey & Company, (Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., June 30, 1774.)
^1. York County Records, Deeds VI, pp. 193-195.
^1. York County Records, Deeds VI, PP. 197-199.
^1. York County Records, Deeds VI, pp. 215-219.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Joseph Royle, ed., February 12, 1762.
^2. MS Account Book of Alexander Craig, 1761-1763, on loan to Research Department.
^3. MS Day Book kept at Printing Office January, 1764-January, 1766; original at University of Virginia Archives; Photostat, Research Department, CWI.
^4. Journals of the House of Burgesses (1761-1762), pp. 239-240: November 7, 1764.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., October 29, 1767.
^2. Ibid., November 26, 1767.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., November 12, 1767; also November 19, 1767.
^2. Ibid., December 3, 1767.
^3. PRO A.0. 13/32; (microfilm, Research Department). See: Illustration #5 for complete copy. Dr. Pitt and his son were loyalists.
^4. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., October 6, 1768.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., October 27,1768.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., October 27, 1768.
^2. Ibid., May 18, 1769.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Rind, ed., October 26, 1769.
^1.Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., December 14, 1769.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Rind, ed., April 19, 1770.
^2. Carter MS Papers, Virginia Historical Society: Robert Carter 1705-1771; (microfilm, Research Department).
^3. York County Records, Wills & Inventories XXI, (1760-1771), p. 530.
^4. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., May 16, 1771. Rind's Virginia Gazette of May 23rd and 30th carried almost identical notices.
^1. MS Papers of Robert Carter (1705-1771), Virginia Historical Society; copied from card in Research Department.
^2. Virginia Gazette, Rind, ed., October 15, 1772.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon, eds., November 12, 1772.
^2. Ibid., William Rind, ed., November 12, 1772.
^1. York County Records, Wills & Inventories XXII, (1771-1783), pp. 161-163.
^2. Virginia Gazette, Rind, ed., November 11, 1773.
^1. PRO A.0. 13/32; (microfilm, Research Department), See: Illustration #5 for complete account.
^2. Ibid.
^3. Virginia Gazette, Clem: Rind, ed., May 12, 1774.
^4. Ibid., September 12, 1774.
^5. Webb-Prentis Papers 1757-17802 Alderman Library, University of Virginia; (microfilm, Research Department).
^1. PRO A.0. 13/32; (microfilm, Research Department).
^2. See: Illustration #3 for biographical data. Dixon was a partner of William Hunter, in the Virginia Gazette, published on Lot 48.
^1. York County Records, Deeds VIII, (1769-1777), pp. 465-466.
^2. Ibid., Wills & Inventories, XXII, p. 360.
^1. York County Records, Deeds VIII, (1769-1777). pp. 469-471.
^2. As Hunter built a small house on the back of Lot 48 for his mother, owned the printing office to the front of this lot, and dwelling and outhouses on Lot 47, it is impossible to know what house or houses were repaired. See: Illustration #6 for complete account with Harwood.
^1. Virginia Gazette, Dixon & Hunter, eds., December 5, 1777.
^2. Ibid., July 17, 1778.
^3. See: Illustration #1 for architect's drawing from the Frenchman's Map.
^4. Loyalist Claims, Public Record Office, Virginia Claims, London: Audit Office 13, bundle 31, (photostat, Research Department).
^1. York County Records, Deeds VI, p. 121.
^2. American Loyalists Transcripts, Audit Office of Public Record Office of England 1783-1790; vol. 59, pp. 536-543; (Microfilm, Research Department).
^1. PRO A.0. 13/30; (photostats, Colonial Williamsburg Archives).
^2. Ibid.
^3. York County Records, Deeds VI, pp. 428-429; Recorded January 18, 1790.
^4. See: Illustration #2 for complete tax records.
^5. Greenhow was a merchant son of John Greenhow, merchant of Williamsburg. See: House History Lots 159-160 for further biographical notes.
^7. Mutual Assurance Society, policy #114 (April 19, 1796) and policy #668 (May 30, 1806), (photostats, Research Department).
^1. Copy in Research Department.
^2. Williamsburg Land Tax Transfers, Virginia State Library Archives; card in Research Department. Cary Drummond's lot was 46. See: House History of Archibald Blair Storehouse, Research Department. Dufort paid personal property tax from 1814 to 1817. (microfilm, Research Department.)
^3. York County Records, Deeds VIII, P. 502-503.
^4. See: Illustration #2 for complete Land Tax records.
^5. Ibid.
^6. Ibid.
^7. Ibid. James Davis, Jr. is not to be confused with James Davis, Sr. who owned John Carter's Store site from ca 1796 to his death in 1830. See: House History of John Carter's Store, Research Department. James Davis Sr. was a tailor. James Jr. was a merchant. See: Illustration #2.
^1. Southall Papers, Legal Cases and Estates, folder 132 James City County, William & Mary College Archives: John A. Mackinder, trustee for Roscow Cole et al vs. James Davis' administrator, 1842.
^2. Ibid., folder 194, Williamsburg.
^1. Southall Papers, Legal Cases and Estates, folder 195, Williamsburg; William & Mary College Archives.
^3. Business Accounts George W. Southall, folder 342, William & Mary College Archives.
^1. Business Accounts George W. Southall, folder 342, William & Mary College Archives.
^2. Ibid., Accounts not located by Counties, folder, 331.
^3. Ibid., folder 342.
^1. See: Illustration #2 for complete records.
^2. A Williamsburg Scrap Book (Richmond, 1932), compiled by The Williamsburg Garden Club, pp. 79-66: "A Scion of Royalty" and illustration opposite p. 80: "Home of the Queen's Granddaughter."
^3. Ibid., pp. 79-80.
^1. James Davis gained the property in 1825 via Joseph A. Repiton devise of Joseph A. Dufort. In 1822 Mr. Joseph Repiton's estate (medical bills) were paid by Captain Davis. Looks as though Davis was executor for the elder Repiton. (Galt Medical Account Book 1820-1831, Colonial Williamsburg Archives, p. 81.)
^2. Galt Medical Account Book 1820-1831, Colonial Williamsburg Archives, pp. 72, 81.
^3. The Record of Bruton Parish Church (Richmond, 1941) p. 119.
^4. Philip Ignatius Barziza, grandson of Lucy and John Paradise, and son of Lucy Paradise and Count Antonio Barziza of Venice, came to Virginia following the death of his grandmother, Lucy Paradise, to claim his part of her estate. He became an American citizen and lived in Williamsburg for many years. He married Cecile Bellette of Williamsburg and had ten children. Phillippa Barziza, one of his children, moved to Texas with her brother, Decimus Ultimas Barziza, who had become a prominent lawyer there ca 1850. See: Archibald Bolling Shepperson's John Paradise and Lucy Paradise (Richmond, 1942) pp. 447-448.
^5. Williamsburg Deed Book I, pp. 433-434.
^1. James City County and the City of Williamsburg Court Records, Deed Book I, p. 551. Deed dated October 9, 1880.
^2. Freemasonry in Williamsburg, by George E. Kidd (1957), p. 180.
^3. Personal Property Tax, Williamsburg; (microfilm from Virginia State Library Archives, Research Department).
^4. William and Mary Quarterly, series 2, vol. 5, pp. 48. 113-114, 118.
^5. "Recollections of John S. Charles" (1933); (typescript, Research Department), p. 43.
^1. Mrs. Victoria M. Lee, "Williamsburg in 1861" (1933), p. 75 in "Recollections of Williamsburg," bound copy, Research Department.
^2. Directory of Williamsburg (1898), Research Department.
^3. Wilkinson had gained the property in 1880. (Williamsburg Deed Book I. pp. 551-552.) He sold part in 1890 to Debress. (chain to title, Accounting Department)
^4. Directory of Williamsburg (1898).
^1. Mrs. Braithwaite owned Lot 48 known as "The Printing Office" site.
^2. Harris was owner of Lot 49.
^3. Virginia Gazette, Williamsburg: W. C. Johnston, prop., Saturday, April 25, 1896, p. 2.
^4. James City County and the City of Williamsburg Court Records, Deed Book 3, pp. 46-48.
^5. Ibid., Deed Book 1, pp. 551-552.
^1. James City County and the City of Williamsburg Court Records, Deed Book 2, p. 338.
^2. Ibid., Current Land Book, p. 35.
^3. Ibid., Deed Book 14, pp. 260-262.
^4. Ibid., Chancery Book., March 23, 1907.
^5. Ibid., Deed Book 13, p. 28.

Illustration #1

RR139101 FROM FRENCHMANS MAP 1782?

RR139102 FOUNDATIONS UNCOVERED BY ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATION AUGUST 1932. - FEB. 1952

Illustration #2

Williamsburg Land Tax Records:
1782 William Hunter's Estate2 lots £10:0:0
1782William Hunter Senr Estate4 " 2:0:0
1785William Hunter's Estate 2 " 15:0:0
William Hunter Senr 4 " 3:0:0
1786William Hunter's Estate 2 " 18:0:0
1788 William Hunter Senr 4 " 2:0:0
1789-92William Hunter's Estate 4 " 2:10:0
1792Williarft Hunter's Estate 4 [sic] 25:0:0
William Hunter Senr 4 lots[no value given]
1793-97William Hunter's Estate 4 "25:0:0
1798-99William Hunter's Estate 4 " $83.34
1800-01Wiliiam Hunter's Estate 1 " 50.00
1802 William Hunter's Estate 3 " 50.00
1803 John Smith [via] Hunter 1 " 50.00
1804Robert Greenhow [via] Hunter1 "50.00
1817 Anty Dufort 1 " 100.00x
1819 Anthony Dufort 1 "178.00
1820-24Joseph Dufort est1 lot$1100 lot & bldgs; $1000 Formerly charged in the name of Anthony Dufort's est.
1825James Davis Jr1 "$1100 Lot & buildings; $1000 via Jos. A. Repitan devise of Joseph A. Dufort.
1826-40James Davis1 "$1100 Lot & bldgs; $1000 bldgs.
1840James Davis1 "$1200 Lot & bldgs; $1000 bldgs.
1842James Davis Est.1 "$1700 Lot & bldgs; $1500 bldgs Reassessed by the Com. Revenue, additional buildings having been added.
1843-50James Davis Est.1 "$1700 lot & bldgs; $1500 bldgs.
1851Charlotte Davis1 "$1800 Lot & buildings; $1500 bldgs.
Life Estate
1852-57Charlotte Davis1 "$1500 Lot & buildings; $1200 bldgs.
1858-60Charlotte Davis1 "$1500 Lot & buildings; $1200 bldgs.
1861Charlotte Davis1 "$1500 Lot & Buildings; $1200 Exempt from Corp. Tax.

Illustration #3

CHRISTOPHER DeGRAFFENRIED

Christopher DeGraffenried came with his father, Baron Christopher DeGraffenried (born in Bern Switzerland) to America around the turn of the seventeenth century. The Baron with his wife, Regina Tscharner, whom he married at Worb in 1684, began a colony in North Carolina which he named "New Bern" in honor of his old home in Switzerland. The Baron returned to Switzerland. The Baron returned to Switzerland in 1713 and remained there until his death in 1743.

The son, Christopher, subject of this sketch, did not return with his father. On February 22, 1714 he married at Charleston, S. C., Barbara Tempest (nee Needham) daughter of Sir Arthur Needham of Herefordshire, England. She was born in 1688. In the family Bible, Christopher wrote: "We were married in Charleston S.C., in America, Feb 22 , 1714. God bless us and our issue. We moved first to Phila. to Maryland and lastly to Va." As his father's efforts in North Carolina were a failure as far as financial success was concerned, young Christopher was left with little with which to start his career in America. However, he settled in Prince Edward County, Virginia, but maintained a town house in Williamsburg.

From 1721 to ca. 1739 Mr. and Mrs. DeGraffenried taught dancing in Williamsburg and at the plantations up and down the James River. William Byrd in his London Diary 1717-1721 mentions DeGraffenried teaching dancing at Nathaniel Harrison's near Westover. He taught the Burwell children, also.

An only child was born to Christopher and Barbara Needham DeGraffenried - a son named "Tscharner" honoring the mother of Christopher. Miss Ellen Glasgow, the novelist, was a descendant of Tscharner DeGraffenried. Tscharner was baptized by Commissary Blair in Bruton Parish.

Fauquier's letter about the DeGraffenried's follows:

Wmsburgh Novr 15th 1764

Sir
On the Receipt of your Letter of the 25. Febry last which did not reach me till the 1st of Sepr I immediately enquired into the State of the Family of the Graffenrieds and was informed that one of that name followed the profession of a Dancing master in this Colony, and was well known to most of the Gentlemen of the County that he died and left a Son who was bred at the College, and whose Legitimacy was disputed; but that he now enjoys some Land as legitimate Son and heir to his Father.

A Gentleman who was a fellow Collegian has wrote to him to come down to me, with the proper legal proofs necessary to prove his Dessent. He lives at a great Distance from this City and I have not yet seen him; when I do I will take Care that all necessary Testimonials shall be transmitted to you. This Gentleman is the Tscharner Graffenreid mentioned in the memorial of the Family…

Fauquier to Edward Sedgewick

    SOURCES:

  • History of the DeGraffenried Family by Thomas P. DeGraffenried (New York, 1925) pp. 69, 74-140, 136, 142, 149, 150.
  • Virginia Gazette, Feb. 25, Oct. 7 & 21, 1737; March 31, 1738; April 20, 1739.
  • The London Diary of William Byrd ed. by Wright & Tinling (New York, 1958) Nov, 4. 1720; Jan. 4 & 6, March 5 & 6, 1721.
  • Virginia Magazine History, vol. IX, pp. 239-241.
  • Prince George Minute Book 1737-1740, pp. 183, 382.
  • Charles City Order Book 1737-1751, p. 414.
  • William & Mary Quarterly, series 1, vol. XV, p. 203. (baptism of Tscharner)
  • P.R.O. CO 5/1345 (M-200, Research Department), Letter of Governor Fauquier, Williamsburg, November 15, 1764 to Edward Sedgewick re dancing master DeGraffenried.

JOHN DIXON

See: The Printing Office Report (1952) prepared by Mary Goodwin, under Appendix LXVII-LXXII for biography of John Dixon. This sketch is very detailed and covers 6 pages.

WILLIAM HUNTER

See: The Printing Office Report (1952) prepared by Mary Goodwin, under Appendix LIV-LXVI, biographical sketch of William Hunter.

SAMUEL HYDE

Samuel Hyde was a son of Robert Hyde, attorney of York County, Virginia, who was said to be related to Edward Hyde, Lord Clarendon (lord chancellor of England from 1658-1674). Samuel Hyde's mother, Jane Underhill Hyde, was a daughter of Captain John Underhill of Felgate's Creek, York County.1 Robert Hyde's will was declared null and void by the York County Court on November 17, 1718 because of testimony that he was not "in his proper Senses at the time of the Execution thereof;" and Samuel Hyde was appointed administrator of his father's estate.2 The appraisement of Robert Hyde's personal estate, made November 17, 1718 only totalled £174.14.7. It was recorded March 16, 1718/19.3

Samuel Hyde lived in York County. He married three times. By his first wife he had daughters, Anne (died 1743) and Rebecca who married Robert Shield. His second wife was the widow of James Cosby; and by his third wife who survived him, he had three children: John, Mary and Judith.4 Samuel Hyde died in 1739 leaving a will written in Yorkhampton Parish, York County, dated July 16, and recorded March 17, 1740.5 He mentioned his wife, Sarah, and minor children: John, Mary and Judith to whom he left most of his lands in York County along with eleven slaves. He left his daughters, Anne Hyde and Rebecca Hyde lands at Chickahominy in James City County and five and four slaves respectively.6

Hyde owned Lot 47 in Williamsburg from September 3, 1717 to March 9, 1718/19. (See: House History.)

THOMAS JONES

Colonel Thomas Jones was the son of Captain Roger Jones who came over to Virginia in 1680 with Lord Culpeper with whom he seems to have had relationship of friendship. Colonel Jones's father came from Stephney, England and was a merchant of London and Virginia. His wife was Dorothy Walker Jones.

Thomas Jones married Elizabeth Pratt (ca. 1725). About 1713 he patented in King William County 2000 acres of land; 2500 acres in Nansemond County in 1719; ca. 5000 acres in Henrico and 4000 acres in Prince George in 1731.

Elizabeth Pratt Jones was the widow of William Pratt and eldest daughter of Dr. William Cocke, formerly Secretary of State for Virginia and a resident of Williamsburg and Elizabeth Catesby, sister of Mark Catesby, noted naturalist. Thomas Jones and Elizabeth Cocke Pratt Jones had four sons and four daughters: Thomas (born 1726) married Sally Skelton, daughter of James Skelton, clerk of Northumberland County until 1781 when he moved to Hanover County where he died in 1786; Dorothea (born 1727); Catesby; Frederick; William; Annie; Lucy and Elizabeth.

In 1722 Thomas Jones was one of the Aldermen named in the charter for Williamsburg.

In 1719/20 he obtained from the Trustees of Williamsburg lots 313-18 41, 42, 34, 339, 360 and 361. In 1722/3 he got five lots at Queen Mary's Port. From June 1719 to February 16, 1721 Jones was owner of Lot 47 in Williamsburg.

In 1733-1743 he owned storehouses and lots in the city (apparently once owned by William Levingston at £200), He was a merchant.

Around 1750 Thomas Jones moved to Hanover County, Virginia. He died there in 1758 leaving a will dated December 10, 1757 and proved on October 7, 1758.

See: House History for his connection with Lot 47.

    SOURCES:

  • Jones Papers 1649-1889, Library of Congress; (microfilm, Research Department).
  • Webb-Prentis Papers, Alderman Library; (microfilm, Research Department).
  • York County Records, Deeds & Bonds III, pp. 323, 400, 320.
  • Ibid., Orders, Wills XV., p. 535.
  • Virginia Magazine of History & Biography, V, pp. 192-193.
  • Ibid., XXVI, pp. 176-177.
  • Ibid., XXVI pp. 76-80; 162-163; 178-181; 283-287.
  • Ibid., V, P. 192.
  • William & Mary Quarterly, series 1, X, p. 85.
  • Tyler's Cyclopedia of Virginia Biography, I, p. 269.
  • Name Data cards, Research Department.

WILLIAM TIMSON

William Timson, son of Samuel Timson of York County and Mary Juxon, was born in 1678 and died in 1719. He married Ama Maria Jones (born 1685; died 1760), daughter of the Reverend Rowland Jones who died in Williamsburg in 1688 having been the first rector of Bruton Parish. Orlando Jones of Queen's Creek was a brother of Mrs. Timson. William Timson and Anna Maria Jones Timson had children: William (died 1726), John (died 1738), married Elizabeth Pierce; Samuel(died prior to 1718); Juxon (died an infant); Mary who married Thomas Barbar and Elizabeth.

Mrs. Anna Maria Jones Timson after the death of Captain Timson, married ca. 1731 Major William Barbar (died 1733); then ca. 1744 Col. E. Scarboro (died 1753) and lastly, John Thornton.

Timson's will, dated August 11, 1716 and proved September 21, 1719 York County Court, bequeathed three lots in Williamsburg to his three sons: John, William and Samuel Timson.

"Vaulx Hall" on Queen's Creek, was bequeathed in 1694 by Samuel Timson to his two sons, William and Samuel. This plantation was named for Robert Vaulx, leading merchant in London, who married Elizabeth Burwell, sister of Lewis Burwell. Timson bought it in 1683 from George Richards, merchant of London who gained it via the Reverend Peter Temple and Robert Vaulx. Following the Timson ownerships it was owned by James Shields, William Johnson, and Littleton Waller Tazewell, "Vaulx Hall" adjoined "Ripon Hall," plantation of Edmund Jenings on the east.

See: Timson's connection with Lot 47 in body of this report.

    SOURCES:

  • York County Records Orders & Wills #15, P. 491. (Will of William Timson)
  • Ibid., Wills & Inventories #18, p. 445. (Will of John Timson)
  • Ibid., Wills & Inventories #21, p. 55. (Appraisement of est. Anna Maria Thornton 1760)
  • Tyler's Quarterly I, pp. 58, 117, 240.
  • William & Mary Quarterly, series 1, vol. III, pp. 14, 274.
  • Virginia Historical Magazine, vol. XXXVI, p. 40.
  • Colonial Records Project British Museum Survey Report #122-A; (M-284, Research Department). (Mrs. Elizabeth Milner's will mentioning nephew, William Timson &c.)

Illustration #4

York County Records, Wills and Inventories #20, (1745-1759), pp. 512-513.

[June, 20, 1759]

"Greens Appt AN INVENTORY of sundry Goods belonging to the Estate of Sarah Green decd

In the Hall
1 Desk & Book Case£ 5. -. -
12 leather bottom Walnut Chairs5. -. -
1 Round Table 21/6. 1 large Table 40/.3. 1. 6
2 pr Iron Doggs 20/. 12 Pictures of the Seasons £ 4.16/.5.16. -
3 old Maps of the World 3/. 1 Solomons Temple 1/30. 4. 3
1 large looking Glass Gilt frame3.10. -
1 Historical Picture Rachel & Leah0. 5. -
2 very old Pictures 1/. 2 Iron Backs 24/.1. 5. -
1 old Square Table 3/. 1 Candle box 1/60. 4. 6
6 old Leather Chairs 24/. 4 old Rush bottom Chairs 4/.1. 8. -
2 Mahogany Tea boards 13/. 1 Waiter 1/. 0.14. -
3 Silk Chair bottoms 2/6. 1 Warming Pan 7/6 0.10. -
1 large Silver Mugg 2 small Silver Muggs ) 60 OZ 17: at
1 large Silver Tea pot 6 Silver Tea spoons) 6/8 pr OZ.
& pr Tongs) 20. 5. 8
In the Closet in the Hall
Sundry old China Cups Saucers Bowls & Glass Ware1. -. -
A box of Glass & Iron 1/3 - 11 Knives & forks Ivory handles 13/.0.14. 3
In the Chamber
1 Looking Glass 7/6 - 1 Square Table 10/9 0.18. 3
1 old black Table 6d 3 Bedsteads 24/. 1. 4. 6
3 Beds 3 Bolsters 2 Pillows8.10. -
4 Blankets 26/. 1 Silk Patch Work Quilt 21/62. 7. 6
1 Cotton Counterpane 16/. 1 Bed Teaster 7/6. 1 old Glass frame 1/31. 4. 9
1 pr old Dog Irons 1/8. 1 large Asket 3/. 0. 4. 3
In the Upper Chamber
1 old Chest of Drawers 0. 5. -
In the Porch
2 old Tables 4/. 1 Corner Cupboard 15/. 1 Do with black Shelves 5/ 1. 4. -
Linnen
10 pr Sheets very old £5. 9 Table Cloths very old 24/.6. 4. -
12 damask Napkins very old 7/6. 5 Towells 2 Pillow Cases 2/60.10. -
2 old Window Curtains 0. 2. -
In the Kitchen
1 pr brass Scales 6/. 1 Dutch Oven 40/, 1 pr Stilyards 10/.2.16. -
1 large Kettle very old 15/. 1 Bell Metal Skillet 6/1. 1. -
2 brass Candlesticks 2/. 1 Copper Tea kettle 5/. 1 Coffee Pott 2/6. £ 0. 9. 6
1 large Iron Pott, 2 small Do 32/6. 1 pr Iron Dogs 15/ 2. 7. 6
1 Spitt 1 Pot rack 1 frying Pan 8/. 2 pr Tongs 1 Shovel 5/ 0.13. -
10 large Pewter Dishes 15 Plates 36/. 1 tin Cullander 2/. 1.18. -
1 Coffee Mill 5/. 1 Pestle & Morter 10/. 0.15. -
1 Copper Still £3..10/. 2 Washing Tubs 2 pails 3/9 3.13. 9
1 old Chair and Harness 2. -. -
Bridget £ 30 - Sarah a Girl £ 30 Sam a Boy £ 40 100. -. -
Lambert £ 50 - London £ 50 - Robin - £ 50 150. -. -
A Parcel of old Books 1.10. -
£338.17. 2
Nicholas Waters Mortgage 215. -. -
2 Years Interest 11.10. -

Debts due from G. Pitt
Do from J Shelton

Pursuant to an Order of York Court dated June 20th 1757 the Subscribers having been first duly Sworn before a Justice of Peace have appraised in Current Money the Slaves and Personal Estate of Sarah Green deed as far as came to our knowledge as above Stated Witness our hands this _____ day of April 1759.

Alexr Craig
Blauet Pasteur
John Carter."

[Recorded the 21st of May 1759 in York County Court.]

Illustration #5

P.R.O. 254 AO 13/32, Loyalist Claims 1777-1789, Survey Report 2396, (M-490, Research Department).

To the Right Honourable the Lords of the TREASURY.

The Memorial of RICHARD FLOYD PITT, an American Loyalist, Most Humbly Sheweth,

THAT your Memorialist is the Son and Claimant of the Property of George Pitt , who was born in the Parish of St. Swithin's , of the City of Worcester , in England , on the 11th of June , 1724, was bred a Surgeon. And in that capacity he went to America , and arrived in Virginia the 8th of February, 1744, where he settled. And on the 16th of December , 1753, married Sarah Garland , a Native of America , and on the 15th of November following your Memorialist was born.

In the year 1755 your Memorialist's Father was appointed, by the English Goverment, Master or Keeper of the Magazine in Williamsburg , which contained all the Military Stores for the Province of Virginia . He was likewise Muster Master General, and in such high Esteem with the Governor, insomuch that very great Confidence and Trust was reposed in him and he had the Honor conferred on him of proclaiming Peace in the Year 1763, after the Reduction of Louisbourg and Quebec .

On the 12th of October , 1768, your Memorialist's Father was nominated by the Governor as the most proper Person to bring over his Dispatches at that Critical Period. And upon his arrival in England he had several Audiences with the late EARL OF CHATHAM, which afforded him an Opportunity of laying before Goverment his finding out the Secret of making Salt-petre in Virginia , which was to have been rewarded by His Majesty's Royal Letters Patent; but the unhappy Disputes that afterwards happened, prevented the same being put into Execution, that certain Buildings had been erected for preparing the same at a very considerable Expence.

Your Memorialist's Father returned to Williamsburg , Virginia , where he continued till the late War, and at the breaking out of Disturbances, the Americans applied to him to surrender to them the Possession of the Magazine and Stores, which he refused at the Risque of his Life; and upon such Refusal they took Possession by Force of Arms, and declared your Memorialist's Father and himself Traitors to their Constitution, and were thereupon obliged to act defensively.

LORD DUNMORE, the Governor at that Time, sent for a Number of Marines from the Men of War lying at Burwell's-ferry , about three miles from Williamsburg , opened the Doors of the Magazine and carried off the Major part of the Stores, to prevent their falling into the Hands of the Americans.

This Act so enraged the Americans against your Memorialist's Father, that he was obliged to leave Williamsburg and return to England for Safety, otherwise must have fallen a Victim to the enraged Populace, for the active and loyal Part he had taken, leaving behind him Landed Property, Negroes, Book Debts, &c, to the Value of Ten Thousand Pounds, in Expectation that the Interference of Great Britain would restore him his Property and Estates; the Loss of which, and other Family Misfortunes, brought a Period to his Life in the Year 1776.

Your Memorialist is now (and has been for upwards of Thirteen Months past) confined for Debt in his Majesty's Prison of the Fleet , in great Distress arising from unavoidable Necessity, and without any Hope of being relieved, otherwise than what may come to be allowed him from the Loss your Memorialist has sustained; and a due Consideration of being entitled to partake of that Relief allotted to the unhappy Sufferers, the American Loyalists.

Your Memorialist having a Wife and Child, most humbly prays your Lordships will please to order a Temporary Relief to be allowed him for the Support of the same, until such Time as his unfortunate Case can be taken into Consideration,

And your Memorialist, as in Duty bound, shall ever pray,

Richard Floyd Pitt .

I do Certify that Richard Floyd Pitt , the within named Memorialist, was born in Virginia and his Father and Family (whom I have known for many Years) resided at Williamsburg and his said Father was Keeper of the Magazine, and very active in the Service of Government. And that he likewise arrived in England during the War, and left his Property behind him in the Hands of the Americans , as stated in the Memorial, As Witness my I hand this 28th day of November , 1787,
(Signed) ARIANA RANDOLPH.,

No. 12, Brompton-Row, Knightsbridge , Widow of John Randolph , Esq. the King's Attorney General, late of Williamsburg, Virginia , deceased.

This is to certify that I knew Mr. Richard Floyd Pitt , in Virginia; that Mr. Pitt is in very great Distress, and that I believe the Contents of the above Memorial to be true.
(Signed) JOHN R. GRIMES.,
Agent to the Virginia Loyalists.
Brompton-Row ,
Nov. 29th, 1787.

P.R.O. 254 AO 13/32, Loyalist Claims 1777-1789, Survey Report 2396., (m-490, Research Department),

[January 29, 1779]

TO THE RIGHT HONBLE LORD NORTH, AND OTHER THE LORDS OF HIS MAJESTYS MOST HONORABLE BOARD OF TREASURY.
THE HUMBLE MEMORIAL OF RICHARD PITT, SON OF GEORGE PITT, LATE OF WILLIAMSBURG VIRGINIA; DECEASED. HUMBLY SHEWETH

That your Memorialists late Father, was born in the City of Worcester, who served his Time to his Father, as a Surgeon, and Apothecary.

In the Year 1724 he went over to, and settled at Williamsburg in Virginia, and in the Year 1753 married the Widow, of Mr John Garland, with whom he had a genteel Fortune, in Houses, Lands, & Negroes, to the amount of near ten thousand Pounds, and by whom he had seven Children, all now living.

During his residence in Williamsburg which was upwards of 30 Years, he acquired as well by his Profession, as by trading in British Manufactures, a considerable Fortune, Independent of his Wives, to the Amount at least of £4000; And was appointed Storekeeper to the Kings Magazine there, but on the breaking out of the Rebellion, in America, his employ under Government, was taken from him by the Rebels.

The Troubles in that Country increasing, and he not caring to enter into such Rebellion, he left all his Houses, Lands, Negroes, and other valuable Effects, as above stated, and flew with his Children, to England for Protection.

On his Arrival he went to reside at Stratford on Avon, in Warwickshire, but the Thoughts of loosing all his Property to the above Amount, preyed so much on his Constitution, that he survived only four Months from his first Landing in England, leaving his seven Children destitute of all Manner of Support, myself the Eldest, being then about twenty Years of Age.

Your Memorialist therefore most humbly prays such Relief in the Premises, as to your Lordships shall seem meet, and your Memorialist shall ever pray.

Berwick Street Soho.

I know the above Memorialist Richard Pitt to be an American, born in Virginia, & the son of Dr George Pitt who lived in acceptable Manner for some Years in Wmsburg in Virginia, January 29, 1779.
John Randolph

Illustration #6

Humphrey Harwood's Ledger, B, pp. 2, 37.
2MR WILLIAM HUNTERDR
1776
October 23To 500 bricks 13/9 20 bushs of lime 15/. a Grate wt 74 ½ lb @ 7 ½ d£ 3.15. 3-¾
To Altering a Grate 6/3 by R.B. to laying a harth & Seting a grate 10/-.16. 3
To layg 2 harth 5/. & fixing a Grate 7/6. 18 bushs of lime @ 9d & 1 ½ do hair 2/31. 8. 3
To mendg Larthing & plastering 22/6. & 5 days labour @ 2/.1.12. 6
To Whitewashing Chamber & parlour 7/6. & 4 Other Rooms & a passage @ 3/91. 6. 3
To Mendg Oven & Ash House 2/. to 200 larths 2/. & A bushel of hair 1/6-. 5. 6
To Cash lent you at Majr Hornsby's to pay for a bowl & 2 Muggs 7/.-. 7. -
November 25To half a Dozen Walnut Chairs 90/ & A Mahoganay tea table 36/06. 6. -
1777
February 1 To 8 days labour @ 0 2/. Cleeng bricks. (8th) 15 days labour 30/ digg Celler2. 6. -
To 22 do labr @ 2/. Cartg 4 loads of Sand 8/. 140 bushs lime @ 9d7.17. -
To 3750 bricks @ 27/6 (20th) to 4000 Do @ 27/6 & Cartg 1 load of Sand 2/. 10.13.1-½
20 To building Cellar walls 100/. & 9 days labour @ 2/. & Carting a load Sand 2/.6. 0. -
March 17To 100 bushels of lime @ 9d 10000 bricks @ 27/6. 21 days labor @ 2/ & 5 lods Sand 2/. 20. 2 .0
22 To building kitching Chimmey & Oven 65/. & build Do to Dwelg House 80/ -7. 5. -
May 11 To 20 bushs of lime 15/. 230 bricks @ 2/9. ¼ bush whitewh 9d & Setg a Grate with Rubd bricks 20/.2. 2. 3
To turning 2 trimers & laying 2 harth 10/. & 1 Days Labour 2/-.12. -
15 To 1800 larths 22/6: to 2 bushels of hair 4/. & 20 do lime l5/. & 1 load Sand 2/.2. 3. 6
To Larthing, & plastering Chamber below 70 yds @ 6d1.15. -
26 xxxxxxx [ 2 lines crossed out in ms.]
June 29To 40 bushls of lime 30/. 2 do hair 4/. 9 days Labour @ 2/.2.12. -
June 29xxxxxx [ 2 lines crossed out in ms.]
Novemr 18To 2 bushls of lime 2/ & altering a Grate 5/. & labours work 1/6 . 6. 8
1778
January 4To 2900 Nails @ 20/ pr M. 700 larthes @ 2/. & 28 bushels of lime @ 1/35. 7. -
To 1 bushel of hair @ 2/6 4 days labour @ 3/6-.16. 6
To larthing & plastering 60 yards @ 7 ½d1.17. 6
£ 91. 9.11
WILLIAM HUNTERDR
1778
June 4th to a Qr of Veal 22/6 1. 2. 6
June 10th To 7000 bricks, Lime and Laying in Chimney at Quarter 100/. pr M. £ 35. 0. 0
To 8 ½ days Cart hier Carting bricks & lime out to your Quarter @ 40/. 17. 0. 0
To 2 ½ bushels of Mortar 4/6 & mending Plastering 5/. & labr 2/. &
----m Barham, Tenant Whitewashing 3 Rooms & passage 2. 7. -
27. To 3 bushels of Wheat @ 8/1. 4. -
July 2 To 4600 bricks, lime & laying them in wall at the office @ 100/. 23. 0. -
26. To A Quarter of Veal 20/. (Augt 24th) To 2500 Well bricks @ 70/. 9.15. -
August 24 To 15 bushs of lime @ 1/6. to bricking up top of well 18/. & labr 6/ 2. 6. 6
£ 91.15. 0
1779
April 17thTo 1 bushel of lime pr your Man (24th) to 530 bricks 100/ & 6 bushs of lime 6/ 7. 2. -
To underpining paleing 40/. & 1 Days labour 18/. 2.18. -
June 24 To 2 bus lime 12/. & Repairing front Steps 30/ & labours work 8/ 3. 2. -
Decemr 5 To Sundry work Done to Amount of - - - - - - - 184. 9. -
Per Contra
Cr
1777
Januy 25th By a large Copper Kettle for the factory £ 9. 0. 0
December 23rd By Cash in part per Account 41. 2. 6
1778
February 5thBy Office Account 48/5 & Cash £35.941. 7. 5
1778Per ContraCr
October 20thBy Cash £ 15. 0. 0£15. 0. 0
1779
March 19thBy Cash in full76.15. 0
£91.15. 0
1780
January 26thBy his account £37. 4. 0£37. 4. -
By cash to Balance £160.7.0 160. 7. -
£ 197.11. -
37MR WILLIAM HUNTER DR.
1780
January 30th Ditch 290 yards @ 4d 4.16. 8
April 24 To A quarter of Veal 5/ ¾ 13. 10s. (May 29th) to a Qr Do £ 12.0.0 .10. - [sic]
May 30 To whitewashing a Room @ 3/9 A passage & 2 Closets @ 3/9 .32. 3
October 30 To 87 bushels of Wheat @ 6/3 2.11. -
1782
March 9 To bricks & Repairing Chimney for Mrs Hunter 5/ . 5. -
£ 8.13.11

RR139103 PITT-DIXON HOUSE

Footnotes

^x. Tax transfers show Anthony Duford came into possession of a house & lot via Robert Greenhow. (Tax transfers, card Research Department, original Virginia State Library.)
^1. William & Mary Quarterly, first series, vol. XIV (1905/6) pp,148-49.
^2. York County Records, Orders & Wills XV (1716-1720) p. 339.
^3. Ibid., p. 420.
^4. William & Mary Quarterly first series, vol. VI (1897/8) p. 126.
^5. York County Records, Wills & Inventories XVIII (1732-1740) pp. 591-95.
^6. Ibid.

NB These notes were prepared by Mary Goodwin who had begun the house history in 1958.
M. A. S.